AAA Study: Cannabis Driving Limits Have No Basis in Science

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The non-profit American Automobile Association was founded in 1902.

There is no scientific basis for establishing specific limits on the amount of THC an individual can have in their system while driving, a new study from AAA (American Automobile Association) has found.

“There is understandably a strong desire by both lawmakers and the public to create legal limits for marijuana impairment in the same manner we do alcohol,” Marshall Doney, AAA president and CEO, told the Associated Press. “In the case of marijuana this approach is flawed and not supported by scientific research.”

According to the study, a blood test threshold for THC is not scientifically possible, and could lead to the potential prosecution and imprisonment of unimpaired drivers. Despite this, several states have THC driving limits, including Washington and Colorado where cannabis is legal for everyone 21 and older.

Read moreAAA Study: Cannabis Driving Limits Have No Basis in Science

Study: Elevated THC Blood Levels Persist for Days in Habitual Cannabis Consumers

By Paul Armentano, NORML

VICTORIA, AUSTRALIAblood — The presence of THC may persist in the blood of habitual cannabis consumers for multiple days at concentrations above 5ng/ml, according clinical data recently published in the journal Forensic Science International.

Australian researchers assessed daily concentrations of THC in the blood of 21 subjects over a period of 7 days of monitored abstinence. Subjects reported having engaging in the “heavy” use of cannabis during the months leading up to the study.

Read moreStudy: Elevated THC Blood Levels Persist for Days in Habitual Cannabis Consumers