Vanderbilt Law School’s Course on Marijuana Law and Policy Review

Vanderbilt Law School’s Course on Marijuana Law and Policy Review

Although it may come as a surprise to many in the mainstream and those who don’t pay attention to marijuana-related topics, many public and private universities offer both courses, certificates and degrees related to marijuana and its many compounds including CBD. One such program is Vanderbilt Law School’s Course on Marijuana Law and Policy Review.

This well-respected school offers a course that will provide critical education regarding the ever-changing ins and outs of marijuana law and policy.

In this article we’ll breakdown a summary of the program, look at potential career options and look at the ranking of the university so you can see if it’s the right for your career goals

Summary of Program

“With 19 million regular users, marijuana is one of the most popular drugs in the country”, states the official course overview on Vanderbilt’s website. “It is also one of the most highly regulated. Until recently, such regulation was virtually synonymous with prohibition. But over the past two decades, a growing number of states have experimented with new approaches to regulating the drug, treating it more like other legal medicines or alcohol than heroin or methamphetamines.”

According to the overview, “These experiments have created a new body of law governing a host of marijuana-related behaviors, from simple possessing the drug to employing those who use it, along with a host of intriguing questions regarding who has authority to regulate the drug.”

This course “takes an in-depth look at the competing approaches to regulating marijuana, the rationales behind these approaches, and where legal authority resides for choosing among them.

What are the elements of a marijuana trafficking offense? May a state legalize a drug the federal government forbids? Who is allowed to use and traffic marijuana under state law? How do states prevent diversion of marijuana into forbidden markets? Are contracts with marijuana dealers enforceable? May employers fire employees who use marijuana for medical purposes? These are just some of the questions the course will address.”

Potential Career Options

Some potential marijuana-related career options you can expect to be relevant to this course include:

Marijuana attorney

Potential Salary: $80,000 – $150,000

Marijuana lobbyist

Potential Salary: $65,000 – $80,000

Marijuana policy advocate

Potential Salary: $45,000 – $65,000

Ranking of University

According to Wikipedia,:

Vanderbilt Law School has consistently ranked among the top 20 law schools in the nation. It is ranked 12th on Above the Law’s 2018 Top Law School Rankings and 18th in the 2020 edition of U.S. News & World Report.

Further info:

  • USNWR ranking: 18th
  • Faculty: 100
  • Enrollment: 64

Course Overview

Below is the full official course overview:

With 19 million regular users, marijuana is one of the most popular drugs in the country. It is also one of the most highly regulated. Until recently, such regulation was virtually synonymous with prohibition.

But over the past two decades, a growing number of states have experimented with new approaches to regulating the drug, treating it more like other legal medicines or alcohol than heroin or methamphetamines.

These experiments have created a new body of law governing a host of marijuana-related behaviors, from simple possessing the drug to employing those who use it, along with a host of intriguing questions regarding who has authority to regulate the drug.

This course takes an in-depth look at the competing approaches to regulating marijuana, the rationales behind these approaches, and where legal authority resides for choosing among them.

What are the elements of a marijuana trafficking offense? May a state legalize a drug the federal government forbids? Who is allowed to use and traffic marijuana under state law? How do states prevent diversion of marijuana into forbidden markets? Are contracts with marijuana dealers enforceable? May employers fire employees who use marijuana for medical purposes? These are just some of the questions the course will address.

 

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