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The Top 10 Cannabis Studies of 2015

cannabisplantIn regards to cannabis science, 2015 has been an amazing year, especially when considering how diverse the findings have been; cannabis has been found to help everything from broken bones to newborn brain injury caused by germinal matrix hemorrhages.

Although narrowing the studies down to a “best-of” list is incredibly challenging, that’s exactly what we’ve done!

Below is our list of the 10 most important cannabis studies of 2015:

 

Cannabis can effectively prevent seizures in those with epilepsy, including bringing about an 100% reduction in some patients, according to the largest study ever conducted on this issue, which was released by the American Epilepsy Society.

 

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) may prevent the rejection of organs during a transplant, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology.

 

Cannabis greatly improves the healing process of broken bones, and makes the bones harder to break in the future, according to a July study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

 

A study funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and released at the beginning of the year, found that driving after smoking cannabis does not make you more likely to get into a car crash.

 

A hugely important study published in the journal Scientific Reports, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, found that hair drug tests for cannabis are entirely inaccurate, as it’s possible for someone to test positive for the substance despite having never consumed it (through secondhand smoke or through someone with cannabis on their fingers touching their hair).

 

A study published by the Oxford journal Carcinogenesis, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, has found that the cannabis compound cannabigerol can prevent the progression of cancer cells formed in the colon.

 

An April study published by the journal Psychopharmacology found that the body’s cannabinoid receptors play a vital role in the management of social interactions and aggressive behavior, and that administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist (meant to mimic the effects of cannabis) significantly reduces aggression.

 

Activation of the endocannabinoid system – something done naturally by cannabis – can attenuate newborn brain injury caused by germinal matrix hemorrhages, which is one of the most common and devastating cerebrovascular events that affect premature infants. This is according to a May study published by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

 

An April study published in the journal Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology found that activation of the body’s cannabinoid receptors can rescue learning and memory after a traumatic brain injury.

 

A study published in the journal Molecular Oncology, and published online by the National Institute of Health, found that the cannabis compound cannabidiol inhibits the growth and metastasis of highly aggressive breast cancer. The study was published in February.

 

9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – the primary psychoactive compound found in cannabis – inhibits melanoma tumor growth, according to a study published in the most recent issue of the journal Life Science, and published online by the National Institute of Health. Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer, killing over 10,000 people a year.

 

Honorable mentions:

 

A history of cannabis use is associated with a lower likelihood of obesity and diabetes, according to a study published in the journal Obesity. A study published a few months later helped validate these results, finding that states with medical cannabis laws are associated with reduced obesity-related medical costs.

 

Consuming at least one joint a day for 20 years has no negative effect on a person’s lung health, according to a comprehensive study published in the journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society, and published online by the National Institute of Health.

 

Daily cannabis use among U.S. college students now exceeds daily cigarette use, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan. Given that cigarettes are fatal and highly addictive, and cannabis is neither of those things, this is definitely a positive development, and one that signifies the acceptance of cannabis into mainstream culture.

 

You can find our list of the top 10 cannabis studies of 2014 by clicking here. You can find our list of the top 10 studies of 2013 by clicking here.

TheJointBlog

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

1 comment

  1. Linda Remy

    Is this only for State where medical marijuana is legal

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