THC Improves Gastrointestinal Symptoms, Finds Case Report

According to a new case report, the daily administration of synthetic oral THC (dronabinol) is associated with an improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms in a patient with CIPO (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction).

The case report, titled Cannabinoids improve gastrointestinal symptoms in a parenteral nutrition–dependent patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, was published in the Journal of Parenteral and Eternal Nutrition. According to ChildrensHospital.org, CIPO is a “rare disorder in which intestinal nerve or muscle problems prevent food, fluid and air from moving through the stomach and intestines. The child experiences the symptoms of an intestinal blockage, though no actual physical blockage exists.”


For the study researchers from France and Switzerland reported on the experience of a 19-year-old female CIPO patient following her twice-daily use of dronabinol capsules over a period of 15 months. They reported that the patient experienced improvements in abdominal pain, distension, and vomiting during treatment.

In addition the subject’s appetite improved and she reported no major adverse side effects from her use of dronabinol. The patient had previously reported similar benefits following her use of inhaled marijuana.

“This paper reports a fortuitous discovery of positive cannabinoid effects on CIPO symptoms in a patient, leading to significant relief of GI complaints”, states the study. “Although further observations are required to consolidate these findings, this case may be helpful for some patients with the same condition.”



The study’s full abstract can be found below:

Chronic intestinal pseudo‐obstruction (CIPO) is a rare and challenging cause of pediatric intestinal failure, requiring long‐term parenteral nutrition in most cases. Despite optimal management, some patients experience chronic abdominal pain and recurrent obstructive episodes with a major impact on their quality of life. Cannabinoids have been successfully used in some conditions. However, their use in CIPO has never been reported in the literature.

We report a case of successful use of medicinal cannabinoids in a patient with CIPO, resulting in a significant reduction of abdominal pain, vomiting, and subocclusive episodes and increased appetite and weight, without major adverse events. Although further observations are required to consolidate these findings, this case may be helpful for other patients suffering from the same condition.

 

For more information on this study, including a link to its full text, click here.

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