Cannabis May Treat Migraines, Finds New Study

Findings from a new study published in the journal European Journal of Pharmacology shows that cannabis may serve as an effective treatment for migraine headaches.

“Current anti-migraine treatments have limited efficacy and many side effects”, begins the abstract of the study. “Although anecdotal evidence suggests that marijuana is useful for migraine, this hypothesis has not been tested in a controlled experiment.” Thus, the present study “tested whether administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces anti-migraine effects in the female rat.”

The results from the study “suggest that: 1) THC reduces migraine-like pain when administered at the right dose (0.32mg/kg) and time; 2) THC’s anti-migraine effect is mediated by CB1 receptors. These findings “support anecdotal evidence for the use of cannabinoids as a treatment for migraine in humans and implicate the CB1 receptor as a therapeutic target for migraine.”

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Study: Cannabis May Fight Intestinal Worms

By Eric Sorensen, Washington State University Science Writer

The Africa Congo Basin.
The Africa Congo Basin, where the study was conducted.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have found that the more hunter-gatherers smoke cannabis, the less they are infected by intestinal worms. The link suggests that they may unconsciously be, in effect, smoking medical marijuana.

Ed Hagen, a WSU Vancouver anthropologist, explored cannabis use among Aka foragers to see if people away from the cultural and media influences of Western civilization might use plant toxins medicinally.

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