Study: Cannabis Can Cause Death of Colon Cancer Cells

According to a new study published by the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, cannabis can cause the death of colon cancer cells, implying that it may be a potential treatment option for the disease.

“Colorectal cancer remains the third most common cancer diagnosis and fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide”, begins the abstract of the study. “Purified cannabinoids have been reported to prevent proliferation, metastasis, and induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell types. However, the active compounds from Cannabis sativa flowers and their interactions remain elusive.” This study was “aimed to specify the cytotoxic effect of C. sativa-derived extracts on colon cancer cells and adenomatous polyps by identification of active compound(s) and characterization of their interaction.”

For the study, ethanol extracts of C. sativa were “analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry and their cytotoxic activity was determined using alamarBlue-based assay (Resazurin) and tetrazolium dye-based assay (XTT) on cancer and normal colon cell lines and on dysplastic adenomatous polyp cells.”

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New Study Provides Proof of CBD’s Potential in Relapse Prevention

Results of a new study “provide proof of principle supporting potential of CBD in relapse prevention”.

The study was published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, and epublished ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, has received attention for therapeutic potential in treating neurologic and psychiatric disorders”, begins the study’s abstract. “Recently, CBD has also been explored for potential in treating drug addiction. Substance use disorders are chronically relapsing conditions and relapse risk persists for multiple reasons including craving induced by drug contexts, susceptibility to stress, elevated anxiety, and impaired impulse control.”

Here, researchers “evaluated the “anti-relapse” potential of a transdermal CBD preparation in animal models of drug seeking, anxiety and impulsivity.” For the study, rats with alcohol or cocaine self-administration histories “received transdermal CBD at 24 h intervals for 7 days and were tested for context and stress-induced reinstatement, as well as experimental anxiety on the elevated plus maze.” Effects on impulsive behavior were established using a delay-discounting task following recovery from a 7-day dependence-inducing alcohol intoxication regimen.

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Study: CBD a “Therapeutic Candidate for Stroke Prevention”

Cannabidiol (CBD) may help to prevent strokes, according to a new study published by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“The endocannabinoid system (ECS) regulates functions throughout human physiology, including neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, autonomic, metabolic, and inflammatory states”, begins the study’s abstract, which was published in-print by the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. “The complex cellular interactions regulated by the ECS suggest a potential for vascular disease and stroke prevention by augmenting central nervous and immune cell endocannabinoid signaling.”

Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychoactive constituent of Cannabis, “is an immediate therapeutic candidate both for potentiating endocannabinoid signaling and for acting at multiple pharmacological targets.” According to reseachers, this “speculative synthesis explores the current state of knowledge of the ECS and suggests CBD as a therapeutic candidate for stroke prevention by exerting favorable augmentation of the homeostatic effects of the ECS and, in turn, improving the metabolic syndrome, while simultaneously stalling the development of atherosclerosis.”

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Study: Topical Marijuana Effective for Managing Pain Associated With Wounds, Can Reduce Opioid Use

Topical marijuana has the potential to improve pain management associated with wounds, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain Management and e-published ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Pain associated with integumentary wounds is highly prevalent yet it remains an area of significant unmet need within healthcare”, states the study’s abstract. “Currently, systemically administered opioids are the mainstay of treatment. However, recent publications are casting opioids in a negative light given their high side effect profile, inhibition of wound healing, and association with accidental overdose, incidents that are frequently fatal.” Thus, “novel analgesic strategies for wound-related pain need to be investigated”.

Researchers state that the ideal methods of pain relief for wound patients are “modalities that are topical, lack systemic side effects, non-invasive, self-administered, and display rapid onset of analgesia”, and; “Extracts derived from the cannabis plant have been applied to wounds for thousands of years”. The discovery of the “human endocannabinoid system and its dominant presence throughout the integumentary system provides a valid and logical scientific platform to consider the use of topical cannabinoids for wounds.”

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Study: Marijuana Often Effective at Treating Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease and Multiple Sclerosis

Marijuana is often effective in treating the symptoms of both Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, and can help those with these conditions reduce their use of prescription drugs.

This is according to a new study published by the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Cannabis has been used for medicinal purpose for thousands of years; however the positive and negative effects of cannabis use in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are mostly unknown”, begins the study’s abstract. “Our aim was to assess cannabis use in PD and MS and compare results of self-reported assessments of neurological disability between current cannabis users and non-users.”

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Study: THC May Help Prevent HIV from Becoming AIDS

According to a new study being published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (JAIDS), and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) may help prevent the progression from HIV infection to the development of AIDS.

“Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a crucial role in host antiviral immune response through secretion of type I interferon”, states the study’s abstract. “[P]rolonged pDC activity has been linked with progression from HIV infection to the development of AIDS.”

The study states that; “Patients with HIV in the United States routinely use cannabinoid-based therapies to combat the side effects of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy. However, cannabinoids, including Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), are well-characterized immunosuppressants.” In this study, researchers report that “THC suppressed secretion of IFNα by pDC from both healthy and HIV+ donors through a mechanism involving impaired phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 7.” These results suggest that “THC can suppress pDC function during the early host antiviral response by dampening pDC activation.”

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Study: Cannabinoids Prevent Long-Term Negative Effects of Severe Stress Exposure

Cannabinoids can prevent the long-term negative consequences of exposure to severe stress, according to a new study published by the journal Hippocampus, and e-published ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Exposure to excessive or uncontrolled stress is a major factor associated with various diseases including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)”, begins the study’s abstract. “The consequences of exposure to trauma are affected not only by aspects of the event itself, but also by the frequency and severity of trauma reminders.”

According to researchers; “Several lines of evidence support the role of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as a modulator of the stress response. In this study we aimed to examine cannabinoids modulation of the long-term effects (i.e., 1 month) of exposure to a traumatic event on memory and plasticity in the hippocampus and amygdala.”

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Study: CBD May Treat Psychiatric/Cognitive Symptoms Associated with Neurodegeneration

Cannabidiol (CBD) may be beneficial in the treatment of psychiatric/cognitive symptoms associated with neurodegeneration, according to a new study.

The study, published by the journal Frontiers in Pharmacology, was also published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Beneficial effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been described for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, psychosis, and depression”, begins the study’s abstract. “The mechanisms responsible for these effects, however, are still poorly understood. Similar to clinical antidepressant or atypical antipsychotic drugs, recent findings clearly indicate that CBD, either acutely or repeatedly administered, induces plastic changes.”

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New Study: Cannabidiol (CBD) Exhibits Strong Anti-Seizure Properties

A new study published by the journal Neurochemical Research, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, has confirmed past research that shows cannabidiol to be an anti-seizure agent.

For the study; “The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) funded Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP) investigated CBD in a battery of seizure models using a refocused screening protocol aimed at identifying pharmacotherapies to address the unmet need in pharmacoresistant epilepsy”.

Applying this new screening workflow, CBD was investigated in multiple mouse and rat models of acute seizures. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment, “CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the acute seizure models.” In chronic models, “CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the corneal kindled mouse”.

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Study: Marijuana Decriminalization in the Czech Republic has had No Effect on Age of Onset of Marijuana Use

According to a new study, the decriminalization of marijuana in the Czech Republic has had no effect on the average starting age of those who consume the plant.

In 2010 the Czech Republic decriminalized the possession of small amounts of cannabis and other drugs. A study being published by the International Journal of Drug Policy, and e-published ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health, has found that this law change has had no effect on the age of onset of marijuana use.

For the study, researchers used “2012 survey data to examine the effect of a change in cannabis policy on the age of onset of cannabis use.” They estimated “the effect of the policy change using a mixed proportional hazards framework that models the transition to first cannabis use.

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