Study: Cannabis Use Effective as a Treatment for Tourette’s Syndrome

Cannabis use is an effective treatment option for those with Tourette’s Syndrome, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience.

A 3D model of Tourette’s Syndrome in the brain.

For the study, which was published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, “The authors retrospectively evaluated effectiveness and tolerability of cannabis in 19 adults with Tourette syndrome”. Researchers found that “Tics scores decreased by 60%, and 18 of the 19 participants were at least “much improved.””

Researchers state that; “All study participants experienced clinically significant symptom relief”; this includes reductions in impulsivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, irritability, rage outbursts and anxiety.

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Georgia Medical Marijuana Bill Signed Into Law by Governor

Georgia’s governor has signed into law a measure that significantly expands the state’s limited medical marijuana law.

Governor Nathan Deal signed Senate Bill 16 into law today, roughly a month and a week after it was passed by the full legislature; it passed the Senate with a 45 to 6 vote, and was passed by the House of Representatives with a vote of 167 to 4 vote

The new law greatly expands the list of conditions that qualify an individual to legally use low-THC marijuana medicines (such as oils and tinctures) to include Tourette’s Syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, epidermolysis bullosa, Alzheimer’s disease, AIDS (when “such syndrome is diagnosed as severe or end stage”) and peripheral neuropathy.

Read moreGeorgia Medical Marijuana Bill Signed Into Law by Governor

Georgia House Passes Medical Cannabis Expansion Measure with 167 to 4 Vote

Georgia’s full House of Representatives has voted to expand the state’s medical cannabis law.

Senate Bill 16 was passed by the House today with a 167 to 4 vote; the proposal has already been passed by the full Senate.

The proposed law would expand the list of conditions that qualify an individual to legally use cannabis-based medicines to include Tourette’s Syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, epidermolysis bullosa, Alzheimer’s disease, AIDS (when “such syndrome is diagnosed as severe or end stage”) and peripheral neuropathy.

These conditions would join cancer, ALS, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, mitochondrial disease, Parkinson’s disease and sickle cell disease as qualifying medical cannabis conditions.

Read moreGeorgia House Passes Medical Cannabis Expansion Measure with 167 to 4 Vote

Nebraska Judiciary Committee Votes to Legalize Medical Marijuana

Nebraska’s Judiciary Committee has passed legislation to legalize medical marijuana.

Legislative Bill 622 was passed by the Judiciary Committee with a 6 to 1 vote, with Senator Stebe Halloran casting the sole “No” vote. The measure allows those with a qualifying condition to possess and use marijuana medicines if they receive a recommendation from a physician and become licensed with the state. A system of regulated marijuana dispensaries would be authorized.

Qualifying conditions would include opioid addiction, AIDS, epilepsy, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease, Tourette’s syndrome, hepatitis C, lupus, Parkinson’s disease, Lyme disease, spinal cord injury or disease, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety.

Read moreNebraska Judiciary Committee Votes to Legalize Medical Marijuana

Georgia Medical Marijuana Bill Passed by House Committee

A key House committee has given approval to a Georgia bill that would greatly expand the state’s medical marijuana program.

Senate Bill 16 would expand a 2015 law that allows for the medical use of cannabis oil by adding six new conditions that qualify someone to become a legal medical cannabis patient. Those conditions are AIDS, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, epidermolysis bullosa, Tourette’s syndrome and peripheral neuropathy.

The bill would also make some other changes, including removing a one-year residency requirement for those wanting to become patients, and altering a quarterly reporting requirement by physicians to a bi-yearly report. Another change is that it allows those from out-of-state to be covered by Georgia’s medical marijuana law for up to 45 days if they are a patient in their home state and have a condition that Georgia’s law covers.

Read moreGeorgia Medical Marijuana Bill Passed by House Committee