Study: Cannabigerol Effective At Stimulating Appetite

The cannabis compound cannabigerol (CBG) is effective at stimulating appetite without any negative side effects, according to a newCannabigerol study published by the journal Psychopharmacology; it was epublished ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health. The study was published shortly after a separate study (also published by Psychopharmacology) which found that two other cannabis compounds – tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) – are also effective at stimulating appetite.

“The appetite-stimulating properties of cannabis are well documented and have been predominantly attributed to the hyperphagic activity of the psychoactive phytocannabinoid, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC)”, states the study’s abstract. “However, we have previously shown that a cannabis extract devoid of ∆9-THC still stimulates appetite, indicating that other phytocannabinoids also elicit hyperphagia. One possible candidate is the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid cannabigerol (CBG), which has affinity for several molecular targets with known involvement in the regulation of feeding behaviour.”

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Study: THC and CBDA Effective in Treating and Preventing Nausea, Stimulating Appetite

cannabiscuresnauseaAdministration of extremely small amounts of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBDA (cannabidiolic acid) – both cannabis compounds – is effective in treating and preventing nausea, and stimulating appetite, in those going through chemotherapy, a new study has found. The study was published in the journal Psychopharmacology, and published online by the National Institute of Health.

“The objective of this study was to determine the effect of combining subthreshold oral doses of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) on acute and anticipatory nausea in rat models of conditioned gaping”, states the study’s abstract.

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Alcohol Use Increases Aggression, Cannabis Use Decreases It, Finds Study

A study published in the most recent issue of the journal Psychopharmacology has found that alcohol significantly increases aggression whileaggression cannabis significantly decreases it. The study was a random controlled trial, typically refereed to as the “gold standard” for research studies.

“This study investigated the acute effects of alcohol and cannabis on subjective aggression in alcohol and cannabis users, respectively, following aggression exposure”, states the study’s abstract.” “Drug-free controls served as a reference.”

Prior to conducting the study, researchers hypothesized that “aggression exposure would increase subjective aggression in alcohol users during alcohol intoxication, whereas it was expected to decrease subjective aggression in cannabis users during cannabis intoxication.”

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Cannabis May Treat Panic and Anxiety-Related Disorders, According to Study

plantA study published in the May issue of the journal Psychopharmacology, and published online by the National Institute of Health, has found that cannabis may treat panic and anxiety-related disorders.

According to researchers; “The present study tested the hypothesis that the endocannabinoid system counteracts aversive responses in the dlPAG-stimulation model of panic attacks.”

Using a cannabinoid receptor agonist that’s designed to mimic the effects of cannabis, researchers injected the medicine into dlPAG rats that were induced with a chemical (NMDA) that causes “panic-like behavioural and cardiovascular responses in freely moving and anaesthetized animals, respectively.”

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Cannabinoids May Treat Aggressive Behavior, Finds New Study

A new study budpublished by the journal Psychopharmacology, and conducted by researchers at the Universitat de València in Spain, has found that the body’s cannabinoid receptors play a vital role in the management of social interactions and aggressive behavior, and that administration of a cannabinoid receptor agonist significantly reduces aggression in animal models.

The study’s abstract explains that “This study was designed to examine the role of cannabinoid CB2r in social and aggressive behavior.”

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Study: Cannabis May Treat Panic and Anxiety-Related Disorders

A new study published this week by the journal PsychopharmacologyMarijuana-plant--007 has found that cannabis may provide a treatment option for panic and anxiety-related disorders.

According to the study; “Direct activation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) inhibits anxiety- and panic-related behaviours in experimental animals. It has remained unclear, however, whether the local endocannabinoid signalling is recruited as a protective mechanism against aversive stimuli.

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