Study: Those Who Use Psychedelics Less Likely to Commit Crimes

Consumers of psychedelics drugs such as magic mushrooms are less likely to commit various crimes, according to a new study published by the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Psilocybin (“magic”) mushrooms.

“Some evidence suggests classic psychedelics may inhibit criminal behavior, but the extent of these effects has not been comprehensively explored”, states the study’s abstract. “In this study, we tested the relationships of classic psychedelic use and psilocybin use per se with criminal behavior among over 480,000 United States adult respondents pooled from the last 13 available years of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2002 through 2014) while controlling for numerous covariates.”

Lifetime classic psychedelic use “was associated with a reduced odds of past year larceny/theft, past year assault, past year arrest for a property crime , and past year arrest for a violent crime.” In contrast, “lifetime illicit use of other drugs was, by and large, associated with an increased odds of these outcomes. Lifetime classic psychedelic use, like lifetime illicit use of almost all other substances, was associated with an increased odds of past year drug distribution.”

Read moreStudy: Those Who Use Psychedelics Less Likely to Commit Crimes

Study: Psychedelic Drugs May Treat Anxiety, Addiction and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

A psilocybin, or "magic", mushroom.
A psilocybin, or “magic”, mushroom.

By Alan Mozes, HealthDay Reporter

In a carefully controlled setting, psychedelic drugs such as LSD or “magic mushrooms” may benefit patients with hard-to-treat anxiety, addiction or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new research suggests.

The finding comes from a review of small-scale and preliminary studies conducted recently in the United States, Canada and Europe, all of which await follow-up.

These preliminary results show that “in the right context, these drugs can help people a lot, especially people who have disorders that we generally treat poorly, such as end-of-life distress, PTSD, and addiction issues involving tobacco or alcohol,” said study co-author Matthew Johnson. Johnson is an associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

Read moreStudy: Psychedelic Drugs May Treat Anxiety, Addiction and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Study: Prohibition on Psychedelics a Violation of Human Rights, Their Use not a Risk Factor for Mental Health Problems

A psilocybin mushroom, which produces a hallucinogenic response when consumed.
A psilocybin mushroom, which produces a hallucinogenic response when consumed.

A study of over 130,000 adults, published this month by the Journal of Psychopharmacology, has found that the use of psychedelics such as LSD and magic mushrooms is not a risk factor for mental health problems. Researchers conclude that the prohibition on such drugs is difficult to justify, and is a violation against human rights.

Using a data set consisting of 135,095 randomly selected United States adults, including 19,299 psychedelic users, researchers examined “the associations between psychedelic use and mental health.”

Read moreStudy: Prohibition on Psychedelics a Violation of Human Rights, Their Use not a Risk Factor for Mental Health Problems

Large Study Links Psychedelic Use to Reduced Recidivism

By Eric W. Dolan, PsyPost.com

A study of more than 25,000 people under community corrections supervision suggests the use of psychedelic drugs like LSD can keep people out of prison. shroom

The research is the first in 40 years to examine whether drugs like LSD and “magic” mushrooms can help reform criminals.

“Our results provide a notable exception to the robust positive link between substance use and criminal behavior,” the researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine wrote in their study, which was published in the January issue of the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

Read moreLarge Study Links Psychedelic Use to Reduced Recidivism