New Government Study Shows No Link Between Cannabis Use and Car Accidents

A new study fromcannabisdriving the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has found that consuming cannabis does not elevate a driver’s crash risk, a result that’s directly contrary to prohibitionist arguments that increased access to cannabis will lead to further car accidents.

The study looked at over 3,000 drivers involved in a car accident over a 20-month period, and measured which substances (if any) were in their system at the time of the accident. The study also included data from 6,000 control drivers who were not involved in any accidents.

“[This study] was the most closely controlled study of its kind that has ever been conducted,” says Gordon Trowbridge, Communications Director for the NHTSA.

Read moreNew Government Study Shows No Link Between Cannabis Use and Car Accidents

NHTSA Study: Cannabis Doesn’t Make You More Likely To Crash Your Car

By Carimah Townes, ThinkProgress.com

A studydriving from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA] concludes that driving after smoking marijuana does not make you more likely to get into a car crash — especially when compared to driving after alcohol consumption.

Researchers studied 9,000 drivers over the past year to examine marijuana’s impact on driving. Although 25 percent of marijuana users were more likely to be involved in a car crash than people who did not use the drug, gender, age, and race/ethnicity of marijuana users were considered, demographic differences actually contributed substantially to crash risk. Younger drivers had a higher crash rate than older ones, and men crashed more than women.

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Study: Evidence Fails to Support DUI Impairment Levels for Cannabis

By Paul Armentano, NORML

WASHINGTON, DC — Available science fails to support the imposition of driving under thedriving influence (DUI) impairment thresholds for cannabis in a manner that is analogous to the per se limits already in place for alcohol, according to the conclusions of a November 2014 publication published by the United States Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Per se traffic safety laws criminalize those who operate a vehicle with trace or specific levels of a controlled substance in their bodily fluids, even in the absence of any further evidence indicating that the subject was behaviorally impaired.

Read moreStudy: Evidence Fails to Support DUI Impairment Levels for Cannabis