New Mexico Court Rules Governor’s Veto of Hemp Bills is Unconstitutional, Laws Can Take Effect

Justices on the New Mexico Supreme Court have upheld a lower court’s decision that strikes down Governor Susana Martinez’s veto of two industrial hemp bills.

Governor Martinez’s vetoes of House Bill 144 and Senate Bill 6 is unconstitutional, the justices ruled, meaning the two measures can officially become law. The proposals permit the Department of Agriculture to issue licenses for the cultivation of industrial hemp for research and development purposes in compliance with federal provisions (Section 7606) of the 2014 Farm Act.

Justices on the Court ruled the governor’s vetoes unconstitutional based on the fact that she failed to provide any written explanation for her vetoes, meaning that legislators had no guideline for revising the bills in a way that would lead to her signing the measures or allowing them to become law without a signature. Eight others measures that the governor vetoed, which are unrelated to hemp or cannabis, will also take effect due to a lack of explanation.

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New Mexico House Passes Another Hemp Bill

Following the veto of two hemp bills earlier this month by New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, the state’s House of Representatives has passed yet another bill to legalize hemp research.

The House passed House Bill 530 yesterday with a 65 to 1 vote. The measure, sponsored by Minority Leader Nate Gentry (R), now moves to the Senate. It’s expected to be quickly approved, sending it to the desk of Governor Susana Martinez.

House Bill 530 is similar to two bills that Governor Martinez has already vetoed this month, but a few minor changes to the proposal’s language puts it more in line with a 2014 federal farm bill that legalized hemp research. Proponents of the measure hope that this change is enough to get Martinez to sign it into law, although this is an uncertainty given the governor gave no explanation for why she vetoed the previous bills.

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New Mexico Governor Vetoes Hemp Research Bill with No Explanation

A bill to legalize hemp research, which easily passed the New Mexico Legislature, was vetoed by Governor Susana Martinez (R).

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez.

The governor gave no explanation to why she vetoed the measure, simply stating that she’s using her constitutional power to do so.

“With the stroke of her pen, the governor just killed countless jobs and new economic opportunities in New Mexico,” said Representative Antonio “Moe” Maestas (D), a cosponsor of the measure, following the veto. “The hemp industry has been a booming success in at least thirty other states. This common sense job-creating legislation would have been a giant step forward for New Mexico’s farmers and entrepreneurs.”

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Second New Mexico Committee Approves Bill to Legalize Hemp With 10 to 1 Vote

A proposal that would fully legalize hemp in New Mexico has passed its second committee, sending it towards a vote in the full House of Representatives.

hempHouse Bill 166 was filed by Representative Rick Little (R). The measure passed the House Agriculture, Water & Wildlife Committee last month. Earlier this week it also passed the House Labor and Economic Development Committee with a 10 to 1 vote.

According to the measure’s officially legislative summary; “House Bill 166 adds new language to the definition of marijuana in the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”) to explicitly exclude the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of the plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”) concentration of not more than 0.3percent on a dry weight basis, the seeds thereof and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture or preparation of the plant or its seeds.”

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New Mexico Hemp Bill Passes Legislature, Heads to Supportive Governor

New Mexico’shemp House of Representatives has voted 54 to 12 to approve Senate Bill 94, the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, which has already passed the state’s Senate. It now heads to Governor Susana Martinez for consideration.

If approved into law, Senate Bill 94 would legalize the cultivation of hemp for research purposes, establishing a regulatory system for those wanting to grow the plant. Research would be conducted by the Department of Agriculture in conjunction with New Mexico State University. The proposal would also allow for the legalization of hemp for industrial purposes, though that won’t take effect until there’s a change in federal law.

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New Mexico Industrial Hemp Bill Approved by Second House Committee, Already Passed Full Senate

New Mexico’shemp House Judiciary Committee has voted 10 to 1 to approve the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, which would legalize the cultivation of hemp for research purposes, and pave the way for commercial hemp production once there’s a change in federal law.

The proposal was approved last week with a unanimous vote by the state’s House Agriculture, Water and Wildlife Committee, and it was passed by the full Senate with a 33 to 8 vote earlier this month.

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Hemp Legalization Bill Unanimously Approved by New Mexico House Committee

New Mexico’s hempHouse Agriculture, Water and Wildlife Committee has unanimously passed the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, a proposal to legalize the cultivation and production of hemp for research purposes. The proposal passed the full Senate with a 33 to 8 vote earlier this month.

The proposal, filed by Senator Cisco McSorley, would establish a regulatory system for the cultivation and production of hemp for those wanting to conduct research on the crop. The proposal also allows for the cultivation of cannabis for commercial purposes, though that portion of the law won’t take effect until there’s a change in federal law.

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Hemp Legalization Bill Approved by New Mexico Senate

New Mexico’sindustrialhemp full Senate voted 33 to 8 today to approve the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, a proposal to legalize the cultivation and production of hemp.

The proposal, filed by Senator Cisco McSorley, would establish a regulatory system for the cultivation and production of hemp for research purposes. The proposal also includes a provision to legalize hemp for commercial purposes, though that portion of the law won’t take effect until there’s a change in federal law.

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New Mexico Senate Committee Votes to Legalize Hemp

New Mexico’sI'm told this is industrial hemp, which grows wild on the preserve. Senate Conservation Committee has voted unanimously – 9 to 0 – to approve the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, a proposal to legalize the cultivation and production of industrial hemp. The committee voted to move the bill forward without recommendation.

If passed into law, the measure would allocate $100,000 to New Mexico State University to establish a seed bank and seed certification program for hemp cultivation. The measure would immediately legalize hemp cultivation for research purposes, and would allow the cultivation of hemp for industrial purposes once federal law changes. Senate Cisco McSorley, the bill’s primary sponsor, believes this will happen rather quickly; “We’re anticipating the federal government to OK production for commercial use in the next couple of months”, he says.

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