Study: Cannabinoids May Reverse Behavioral Deficits Caused By Repeated Social Defeat

A compound meant to mimic the effects of natural cannabinoids was found to reverse the short and long-term deficits caused by repeated social defeat in a new study published by the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Psychosocial stress contributes to the development of psychiatric disorders. Repeated social defeat (RSD) is a murine stressor that causes a release of inflammatory monocytes into circulation. Moreover, RSD-induced anxiety-like behavior is dependent on the recruitment of these monocytes to the brain.

With this in mind, it’s important to note that “Activation of the endocannabinoid (ECB) system [done naturally through the consumtion of cannabinoids] may modulate both neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses mediated by stress”, states the study’s researchers. “Therefore, we hypothesized that a cannabinoid receptor agonist would attenuate RSD-induced inflammation, anxiety, and stress sensitization.”

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New Study Provides Proof of CBD’s Potential in Relapse Prevention

Results of a new study “provide proof of principle supporting potential of CBD in relapse prevention”.

The study was published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, and epublished ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, has received attention for therapeutic potential in treating neurologic and psychiatric disorders”, begins the study’s abstract. “Recently, CBD has also been explored for potential in treating drug addiction. Substance use disorders are chronically relapsing conditions and relapse risk persists for multiple reasons including craving induced by drug contexts, susceptibility to stress, elevated anxiety, and impaired impulse control.”

Here, researchers “evaluated the “anti-relapse” potential of a transdermal CBD preparation in animal models of drug seeking, anxiety and impulsivity.” For the study, rats with alcohol or cocaine self-administration histories “received transdermal CBD at 24 h intervals for 7 days and were tested for context and stress-induced reinstatement, as well as experimental anxiety on the elevated plus maze.” Effects on impulsive behavior were established using a delay-discounting task following recovery from a 7-day dependence-inducing alcohol intoxication regimen.

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Study: Cannabidiol May Help Prevent Relapses in Those Addicted to Alcohol and Drugs

The findings of a study published last week by the journal Neuropsychopharmacology “provide proof of principle supporting potential of CBD [cannabidiol] in relapse prevention”.

“Cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, has received attention for therapeutic potential in treating neurologic and psychiatric disorders”, states the study’s abstract. “Recently, CBD has also been explored for potential in treating drug addiction.” The study notes that substance use disorders “are chronically relapsing conditions and relapse risk persists for multiple reasons including craving induced by drug contexts, susceptibility to stress, elevated anxiety, and impaired impulse control.” Here, researchers “evaluated the “anti-relapse” potential of a transdermal CBD preparation in animal models of drug seeking, anxiety and impulsivity.”

For the study, rats with alcohol or cocaine self-administration histories “received transdermal CBD at 24 h intervals for 7 days and were tested for context and stress-induced reinstatement, as well as experimental anxiety on the elevated plus maze.” Effects on impulsive behavior were established using “a delay-discounting task following recovery from a 7-day dependence-inducing alcohol intoxication regimen.”

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Study: Cannabinoids Can Prevent Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Giving cannabinoids to an individual soon after they experience a traumatic event can prevent post traumatic stress disorder, according toptsd a new University of Haifa study, which was published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

“The findings of our study suggest that the connectivity within the brain’s fear circuit changes following trauma, and the administration of cannabinoids prevents this change from happening,” researchers said in a press release.

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