Study Finds Acupuncture Works by Activating Cannabinoid Receptors

A recent study published by the National Institute of Health has found the first clear evidence that acupuncture activates cannabinoid receptors, which likely plays a vital role in the procedure’s ability to reduce pain.Tapping in acupuncture needle

While studying mice subjects, researchers “found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression.”

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Activation Of Cannabinoid Receptors Can Combat Aids, According to Government Funded Study

A 2012 study funded by the National Institute of Health found that in addition to relieving the symptoms of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), activation of the body’s cannabinoidMarijuana leaf receptors – something which cannabis does naturally – can actually combat its infection.

The study – which was conducted by researchers at George Mason University – found that; “the clinical use of CB2R agonists in the treatment of AIDS symptoms may also exert beneficial adjunctive antiviral effects against CXCR4-tropic viruses in late stages of HIV-1 infection.”

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