Study: CBD May Help Treat Alcohol Use Disorder

Cannabidiol shows promise as a potential treatment option for alcohol use disorder, according to a new study published by the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, and epublished by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“There is substantial interest in the therapeutic potential of cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in plants of the genus Cannabis”, begins the abstract of the study. “The goal of the current systematic review was to characterize the existing literature on this topic and to evaluate the credibility of CBD as a candidate pharmacotherapy for alcohol use disorder (AUD).”

Using a comprehensive search strategy, “303 unique potential articles were identified and 12 ultimately met criteria for inclusion (8 using rodent models, 3 using healthy adult volunteers, and 1 using cell culture).” In both rodent and cell culture models, “CBD was found to exert a neuroprotective effect against adverse alcohol consequences on the hippocampus.” In rodent models, “CBD was found to attenuate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity, specifically, alcohol-induced steatosis.”

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Marijuana Use Helps Some Patients Alleviate Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder, Finds New Study

A new study conducted by researchers at Harvard Medical School, Tufts University and McLean Hospital has found that marijuana use may help patients with bipolar disorder to alleviate their symptoms.

The study, titled Joint Effects: A Pilot Investigation of the Impact of Bipolar Disorder and Marijuana Use on Cognitive Function and Mood, was published by the journal PLoS One, as well as the National Institute of Health.

“Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance in those diagnosed with bipolar I disorder”, states the study’s abstract. “However, there is conflicting evidence as to whether marijuana may alleviate or exacerbate mood symptomatology. As bipolar disorder and marijuana use are individually associated with cognitive impairment, it also remains unclear whether there is an additive effect on cognition when bipolar patients use marijuana.”

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Study Finds Consumers of CBD-Rich Cannabis Extracts “Generally Tested Negative for THC in Hair”

According to a new study being published in the journal Forensic Science International, and epublished ahead of print by the National Institute of Health, even after repeated consumption of CBD-rich cannabis extracts consumers “generally tested negative for THC in hair”.

Consume CBD extracts? You probably won’t fail a hair test, according to a new study,

“Medical cannabis is becoming increasingly popular for many different ailments and improvement of general well-being”, begins the study’s abstract. “Particularly CBD-rich extracts are easily available via online pharmacies, health stores or directly from producers. However, almost all of the extracts contain small amounts of THC. In our study, we investigated THC, CBN and CBD in hair samples from regular CBD rich cannabis users. ”

The goals of the study “were to determine levels of the cannabinoids in hair and to evaluate a possible correlation between regular CBD intake and CBD levels in hair.” All participants consumed cannabis extracts from the same producer, which “contained CBD at different concentrations and small amounts of THC with a CBD/THC concentration ratio of 30”.

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Study: CBD Could Prevent Haloperidol-Induced Orofacial Dyskinesia

Cannabidiol (CBD) may prevent haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia, according  to new research being published by the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity; the research was epublished by the National Institute of Health.

“The chronic use of drugs that reduce the dopaminergic neurotransmission can cause a hyperkinetic movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia (TD)”, states the study’s abstract. “The pathophysiology of this disorder is not entirely understood but could involve oxidative and neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychotomimetic compound present in Cannabis sativa plant, could be a possible therapeutic alternative for TD.”

The study states that “This phytocannabinoid shows antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antipsychotic properties and decreases the acute motor effects of classical antipsychotics. The present study investigated if CBD would attenuate orofacial dyskinesia, oxidative stress and inflammatory changes induced by chronic administration of haloperidol in mice.”

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Study: THC Blood Levels “Do Not Correlate Well” With the Level of Driving Impairment

A new study has found that “blood levels of tetrahydrocannabinol do not correlate well with the level of impairment”, and heavy marijuana use doesn’t consistently lead to “cognitive and psychomotor impairment”.

“Marijuana is the most widely consumed illicit substance in the United States, and an increasing number of states have legalized it for both medicinal and recreational purposes”, begins the abstract of the study, which was published in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia, and epublished ahead of print by the National Institute of Health. “As it becomes more readily available, there will be a concurrent rise in the number of users and, consequently, the number of motor vehicle operators driving under the influence.”

With that in mind, the study examined “the cognitive and psychomotor effects of cannabis, as well as current policy concerning driving under the influence of drugs.” To do so, “The authors performed a MEDLINE search on the epidemiology of cannabis use, its cognitive and psychomotor effects, and policies regarding driving under the influence of drugs.”

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Study: Cannabis is a Safe, Effective Palliative Treatment for Cancer Patients

According to a study of nearly 3,000 people, cannabis seems to be a safe, effective and well tolerated palliative treatment for cancer.

The study was published in the European Journal of Internal Medicine, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health. The aim of the study “is to characterize the epidemiology of cancer patients receiving medical cannabis treatment and describe the safety and efficacy of this therapy.”

To do so, researchers “analyzed the data routinely collected as part of the treatment program of 2970 cancer patients treated with medical cannabis between 2015 and 2017.” Among the patients, the “average age was 59.5 ± 16.3 years, 54.6% women and 26.7% of the patients reported previous experience with cannabis.” The most frequent types of cancer were: “breast (20.7%), lung (13.6%), pancreatic (8.1%) and colorectal (7.9%) with 51.2% being at stage 4. “The main symptoms requiring therapy were: “sleep problems (78.4%), pain (77.7%, median intensity 8/10), weakness (72.7%), nausea (64.6%) and lack of appetite (48.9%).”

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Study: Topical Cannabinoids Reduce Corneal Hyperalgesia and Inflammation

According to a new study published by the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoids Research, and published online by the National Institute of Health, topically-applied cannabinoids are effective in reducing corneal hyperalgesia (defined as a state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids) and inflammation.

“Corneal injury can result in dysfunction of corneal nociceptive signaling and corneal sensitization”, begins the study’s abstract. “Activation of the endocannabinoid system has been reported to be analgesic and anti-inflammatory.” The purpose of this research “was to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of cannabinoids with reported actions at cannabinoid 1 (CB1R) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2R) receptors and/or noncannabinoid receptors in an experimental model of corneal hyperalgesia.”

Below describes the methods used for this study:

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Study: Cannabinoids Have Potential Therapeutic Use in Alcohol-Related Problems

Cannabinoids hold potential therapeutic use in alcohol-related problems, according to a new study being published in the journal Alcohol, and epublished ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Case reports and observational studies suggest that the use of Cannabis sp. mitigates problematic ethanol consumption in humans”, states the study’s abstract. “Here, we verified the effects of the two main phytocannabinoid compounds of Cannabis sp., cannabidiol (CBD) and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in the expression of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization in mice.”

For the study, male adult mice “were exposed to locomotor sensitization by daily intraperitoneal injections of ethanol (2.5 g/kg) for 12 days; control groups received saline.” After the acquisition phase, “animals were treated with cannabinoids: CBD (2.5 mg/kg); THC (2.5 mg/kg); CBD + THC (1:1 ratio), or vehicle for 4 days with no access to ethanol during this period.” One day after the last cannabinoid injection, “all animals were challenged with ethanol (2.0 g/kg) to evaluate the expression of the locomotor sensitization.”

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Study: THCA has “Potent Neuroprotective Activity”

According to a new study, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol acid (THCA) has potent neuroprotective activity which may help treat Huntington´s Disease and other neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases.

thca
(Photo: Leafly)

“Phytocannabinoids are produced in Cannabis sativa L. in acidic form and are decarboxylated upon heating, processing, and storage”, states the abstract of the study, published by the British Journal of Pharmacology and the U.S. National Institute of Health. “While the biological effects of decarboxylated cannabinoids such as Δ9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9 -THC) have been extensively investigated, the bioactivity of Δ9 -THCA is largely unknown, despite its occurrence in different Cannabis preparations.” The aim of this study “was to determine whether Δ9 -THCA modulates the PPARγ pathway and has neuroprotective activity”.

For the study; “The effects of six phytocannabinoids on PPARγ binding and transcriptional activity were investigated.” In doing so, researchers found that;

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Study: Legalizing Medical Marijuana Associated with Reduced Opioid-Related Hospitalizations

The statewide legalization of medical marijuana is associated with a reduction in hospitalization from opioids, according to a new study.

The study, conducted at the University of California, was published by the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependency and the National Institute of Health. Researchers assessed the association between medical cannabis laws and hospitalizations related to opioid pain relievers.

“This study demonstrated significant reductions on OPR- (opioid pain reliever) related hospitalizations associated with the implementation of medical marijuana policies”, states the lead researcher. “We found reductions in OPR-related hospitalizations immediately after the year of policy implementation as well as delayed reductions in the third post-policy year.”

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