Study Finds Medical Cannabis Legalization Doesn’t Increase Youth Usage Rates

medcanIn states that have legalized medical cannabis, there has not been an increase in cannabis use among those aged 12 to 17, according to a study published in The International Journal on Drug Policy. The study flies contrary to prohibitionist beliefs that loosened cannabis laws, even for medical use, will lead to increase usage rates among children.

“While states with MML (medical marijuana laws) feature higher rates of adolescent marijuana use, to date, no major U.S. national data set, including the NSDUH (US National Survey on Drug Use in Households), supports that MML are a cause of these higher use levels,” according to researchers at Columbia University. “[W]hen within-state changes are properly considered and pre-MML prevalence is properly controlled, there is no evidence of a differential increase in past-month marijuana use in youth that can be attributed to state medical marijuana laws.”

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Congress Prohibits Justice Department from Undermining State Medical Cannabis Laws

By Drug Policy Alliance

WASHINGTON, DC — Thecannabud final “must pass” federal spending bill that Congress will consider this week, also known as the “cromnibus,”and released by senior appropriators last night includes an amendment that prohibits the U.S. Justice Department from spending any money to undermine state medical marijuana laws. The spending bill also includes a bipartisan amendment that prohibits the DEA from blocking implementation of a federal law passed last year by Congress that allows hemp cultivation for academic and agricultural research purposes in states that allow it. It also contains an amendment blocking marijuana law reform in Washington, D.C., although it is unclear what exactly the amendment blocks.

Read moreCongress Prohibits Justice Department from Undermining State Medical Cannabis Laws