Marijuana Expungement Bill Filed in Washington

Washington State Representative Joe Fitzgibbon has filed legislation that would allow those previously convicted of possessing up to 40 grams of marijuana to have it expunged (removed) from their record.

Under House Bill 1260, those who were previously charged with misdemeanor marijuana possession, and were at least 21 years of age at the time, can apply to have the charge permanently removed from their record. The measure requires the courts to expunge the charge as long as their has been no violent or DUI-related charges that have taken place since the marijuana charge.

House Bill 1260 currently sits in the House Public Safety Committee. Co-sponsors include Representatives Noel Frame, Nicole Macri, Gael Tarleton, Gerry Pollet, David Sawyer, Jessyn Farrell, Ruth Kagi, Eileen Cody; Sherry Appleton, Timm Ormsby, Tana Senn and Joan McBride.

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Missouri Governor Signs Cannabis Expungement Bill

budGovernor Jay Nixon (D) has signed into law a bill that allows for the expungement of most cannabis convictions, both misdemeanors and felonies.

Senate Bill 588 would allow those convicted of cannabis misdemeanors to expunge (remove) it from their record after a three year period; this would mean that the charge would not appear on a criminal background check. Those convicted of felony possession would also be allowed to have the charge expunged, though they would need to wait seven years rather than three. In either instance, fines will need to be paid in full for an expungement to occur.

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Virginia Bill to Allow Expungement of Cannabis Convictions for those Under 21 Coming Soon

expungementRepublican State Senator Ruan McDougle, Chairman of Virginia’s Republican Caucus, has announced that he will soon introduce a bill to allow those under 21 to have cannabis convictions expunged (removed) from their records. According to McDougle, the expungement proposal will be one of several criminal justice reform measures that will be introduced in the upcoming legislative session which begins in January.

According to McDougle, a former prosecutor, those under 21 should be given an opportunity to remove simple possession cases from their record in order to increase their chances of receiving employment. McDougle says the measure would apply only to personal possession cases, and not distribution cases. Those 21 and older who were charged with a cannabis possession offense before they turned 21 would also be able to have the charge expunged.

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Oregon: 50,000 Residents Qualify To Have Cannabis Offenses Removed From Their Criminal Record

By Monterey Bud, Marijuana.com

Thanks to the recent implementation of a novel provision in Oregon’s Senate Bill 844, more than 50,000 residents can now apply to a new program that permits some offenders to expunge marijuana-related crimes from their criminal history.

pastThat’s right, according to the Oregon Cannabis Association, the Beaver State’s sweet new piece of legislation allows those with past marijuana-related indiscretions – including cultivation and distribution – to have their past improprieties purged from their permanent criminal record. Thereby making it easier for those convicted of past marijuana related crimes to find gainful employment.

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Federal Cannabis Expungement Bill Introduced in U.S. Congress

Marijuana-plant--007Representative Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) has introduced The Clean Slate for Marijuana Offenses Act of 2015, a proposal that creates a pathway for the following two groups of federal cannabis offenders to have their charges expunged (removed) from their criminal record: those who were federally charged for activity that was state legal at the time; and those whose offense was the possession of an ounce or less of cannabis.

“The penalties of failed prohibition policies should stop ruining people’s lives. The Clean Slate for Marijuana Offenses Act of 2015 follows Oregon’s lead to provide a pathway for expunging certain federal marijuana crimes,” said Representative Blumenauer in a press release. “People who were caught up in the federal criminal justice system for a marijuana offense that was legal under state law at the time should not carry around a drug record. I support legalizing marijuana at the federal level to put a stop to any state-federal conflicts once and for all, but it is also important that we create pathways for expungement for those who should never have been charged in the first place.”

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Jamaica’s Justice Minister Signs Automatic Cannabis Expungement Bill

jamaicaJust three months after Jamaica decriminalized the possession and personal cultivation of recreational cannabis, Justice Minister Mark Golding has signed into law an order that allows for the automatic expungement of certain cannabis convictions.

The Criminal Records (Rehabilitation of Offenders) (Automatic Expungement of Convictions) Order 2015 automatically expunges past cannabis convictions where the fine did not exceed J$1,000, and for charges involving the possession of cannabis paraphernalia, once a person applies for a certificate of their police record.

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Louisiana Senate Judiciary Committee Passes Bill to Reduce Cannabis Penalties, Allow Expungement of Cannabis Convictions

prettybudsIn a unanimous vote, Louisiana’s Senate Judiciary Committee has given approval to legislation that would drastically reduce the penalties associated with an individuals second and third cannabis possession offense, while allowing those with just one offense to have the charge expunged from their record.

The proposal, sponsored by Senator J.P. Morrell (D-New Orleans), would save the state up to $16 million a year by reducing the penalty for a second cannabis possession offense to a misdemeanor with a maximum jail sentence of 6 months; under current law an individuals second offense is a felony with a potential 5 year prison sentence. The measure would reduce the penalty for a third cannabis possession offense to a felony with a maximum sentence of 4 years, rather than a maximum of 20 as it currently stands.

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Cannabis Expungement Bill Filed in Missouri

Missouri State Senator Bob Dixon, a Republican from Springfield, has filed Senate Bill 451, a proposal to allow for the expungement of most cannabisbudcannabis convictions from all public records.

Senate Bill 451 was drafted by a Missouri Bar Association committee, and has the support of the Missouri Bar Board of Governors, the Missouri Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys.

If approved into law, those with cannabis convictions – other than Class A felonies  – would be eligible to have the charges removed from their records. A provision in the bill specifically authorizes an individual who has his record expunge to deny that the charge ever occurred.

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