Recreational Cannabis Now Legal in Oregon, Unlimited Hemp Cultivation Now Legal in Connecticut

marijuana plant 400With the clocks striking midnight, July 1st is now upon us and laws legalizing cannabis and hemp have taken effect in Oregon and Connecticut.

In Oregon, it is now entirely legal for anyone 21 and older to possess up to half a pound of cannabis at a private residence, or up to an ounce of cannabis in public. They’re also allowed to cultivate up to four plants for personal use. This is due to portions of Measure 91, approved by voters last year, taking effect.

In Connecticut, thanks to House Bill 5780, it’s now legal to cultivate an unlimited amount of hemp without first receiving a license from the state. Under the new law, hemp, which is defined as having no more than 1% THC, is treated like other agricultural products such as tomatoes.

Read moreRecreational Cannabis Now Legal in Oregon, Unlimited Hemp Cultivation Now Legal in Connecticut

Beginning July 1st Unlimited Hemp Cultivation Will Be Legal in Connecticut, No License Required

hemp1On Wednesday, July 1st, House Bill 5780 will become law in Connecticut, legalizing the unlimited cultivation of industrial hemp.

The new law, which officially takes effect at 12:00am on July 1st, removes hemp from the state’s list of controlled substances, legalizing it for all purposes. This means that hemp will be treated like other agricultural commodities such as tomatoes. Farmers will not be required to receive a license from the state, and no limit will be imposed on the number of plants they can cultivate. They will, however, need to maintain a THC level of no more than 1% in all of their plants (if it goes above that, it will be considered cannabis and remain illegal), though that number is higher than the 0.3% limit established in most states that have legalized the crop.

Read moreBeginning July 1st Unlimited Hemp Cultivation Will Be Legal in Connecticut, No License Required

Legislation Ending Hemp Prohibition Becomes Law in Connecticut

Plants-from-hempA bill to end hemp prohibition in Connecticut has become law without the governor’s signature. The measure was passed by the state’s Senate unanimously 36 to 0, and was approved by the state’s House of Representatives with a 142 to 2 vote.

The new law – which goes into effect on July 1st – ends hemp prohibition in its entirety, removing hemp from the state’s list of controlled substances. This allows farmers to cultivate the crop without needing to first receive a license from the state, meaning it would be treated like other agriculture commodities, such as tomatoes. According to an official summary of the bill, it “allows industrial hemp to be grown, used, and sold under state law”.

Read moreLegislation Ending Hemp Prohibition Becomes Law in Connecticut

Connecticut Bill to Legalize Industrial Hemp Passes Senate Unanimously, Heads to Governor

hempShortly after Connecticut’s full House of Representatives gave approval to legislation that would legalize the cultivation of industrial hemp, the state’s Senate has passed the same bill with a unanimous 36 to 0 vote. The vote in the House was 142 to 2.

House Bill 5780 would end hemp prohibition in its entirety, removing hemp from the state’s list of controlled substances. This would allow farmers to cultivate the crop without needing to first receive a license from the state, meaning it would be treated like other agriculture commodities such as tomatoes.

Read moreConnecticut Bill to Legalize Industrial Hemp Passes Senate Unanimously, Heads to Governor

Connecticut House Votes 142 to 2 to End Hemp Prohibition, Allow Unlicensed Cultivation

hemptennesseeConnecticut’s full House of Representatives has approved a bill to end hemp prohibition in its entirety, allowing farmers to cultivate the plant without the necessity of receiving a state license. The measure was approved with a drastic majority, 142 to 2.

House Bill 5780, filed by Representatives Melissa Ziobron (R-34) and Aundré Bumgardner (R-41), would “legalize industrial hemp by removing it from the state “marijuana” and “cannabis-type substances” definitions, thereby removing its status as a controlled substance”, according to an official summary of the bill. Thus, “the bill allows industrial hemp to be grown, used, and sold under state law”.

Read moreConnecticut House Votes 142 to 2 to End Hemp Prohibition, Allow Unlicensed Cultivation