New Mexico Governor Vetoes Bill to Expand Medical Cannabis Law

Legislation that would have expanded New Mexico’s medical cannabis program has been vetoed by Governor Susana Martinez.

Governor Susana Martinez.

House Bill 527 would have added opioid use disorder as a condition that qualifies someone to become a legal medical cannabis patient, given they received a recommendation from a physician and registered with the state.

In her veto letter, Governor Martinez said that allowing medical cannabis for opioid use disorder is “problematic”.

“[I]ncluding“opioid use disorder” to the list of qualifying conditions for which an individual  may enroll in the  program  is  problematic”, says Martinez. In  addition  to  “bypassing  the authority  of  the  Medical  Cannabis Advisory Board”, Martinez says that “Including “opioid  use  disorder” independently will  likely  cause  a  rapid increase  in program  enrollment,  which  the  program  is  currently  unable  to  sustain.”

Martinez’s full veto letter can be found by clicking here.

Martinez also recently vetoed two hemp bills that would have done nothing more than allowed hemp to be researched.

Those in New Mexico who want to let Governor Martinez know their opinion of these vetoes can contact her office by calling (505) 476-2200 or by clicking here.

 

[Update 4/8/2017: This article has been updated to reflect that House Bill 527 would have only added opioid use disorder to the state’s medical cannabis program, not other conditions.]

New Mexico House Passes Another Hemp Bill

Following the veto of two hemp bills earlier this month by New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, the state’s House of Representatives has passed yet another bill to legalize hemp research.

The House passed House Bill 530 yesterday with a 65 to 1 vote. The measure, sponsored by Minority Leader Nate Gentry (R), now moves to the Senate. It’s expected to be quickly approved, sending it to the desk of Governor Susana Martinez.

House Bill 530 is similar to two bills that Governor Martinez has already vetoed this month, but a few minor changes to the proposal’s language puts it more in line with a 2014 federal farm bill that legalized hemp research. Proponents of the measure hope that this change is enough to get Martinez to sign it into law, although this is an uncertainty given the governor gave no explanation for why she vetoed the previous bills.

Read moreNew Mexico House Passes Another Hemp Bill

New Mexico Hemp Bill Passes Legislature, Heads to Supportive Governor

New Mexico’shemp House of Representatives has voted 54 to 12 to approve Senate Bill 94, the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, which has already passed the state’s Senate. It now heads to Governor Susana Martinez for consideration.

If approved into law, Senate Bill 94 would legalize the cultivation of hemp for research purposes, establishing a regulatory system for those wanting to grow the plant. Research would be conducted by the Department of Agriculture in conjunction with New Mexico State University. The proposal would also allow for the legalization of hemp for industrial purposes, though that won’t take effect until there’s a change in federal law.

Read moreNew Mexico Hemp Bill Passes Legislature, Heads to Supportive Governor

New Mexico Industrial Hemp Bill Approved by Second House Committee, Already Passed Full Senate

New Mexico’shemp House Judiciary Committee has voted 10 to 1 to approve the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, which would legalize the cultivation of hemp for research purposes, and pave the way for commercial hemp production once there’s a change in federal law.

The proposal was approved last week with a unanimous vote by the state’s House Agriculture, Water and Wildlife Committee, and it was passed by the full Senate with a 33 to 8 vote earlier this month.

Read moreNew Mexico Industrial Hemp Bill Approved by Second House Committee, Already Passed Full Senate

Hemp Legalization Bill Unanimously Approved by New Mexico House Committee

New Mexico’s hempHouse Agriculture, Water and Wildlife Committee has unanimously passed the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, a proposal to legalize the cultivation and production of hemp for research purposes. The proposal passed the full Senate with a 33 to 8 vote earlier this month.

The proposal, filed by Senator Cisco McSorley, would establish a regulatory system for the cultivation and production of hemp for those wanting to conduct research on the crop. The proposal also allows for the cultivation of cannabis for commercial purposes, though that portion of the law won’t take effect until there’s a change in federal law.

Read moreHemp Legalization Bill Unanimously Approved by New Mexico House Committee

Two New Qualifying Conditions Added to New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program

Those with Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease who receive a recommendation from their physician will be authorized to possess medical cannabis legally under new rule changes nmapproved by Governor Susana Martinez.

“Friday’s announcement demonstrates the response from the Martinez administration we have been seeking for a long time,” said Emily Kaltenbach, New Mexico Director of the Drug Policy Alliance, which has been trying to get these, and other conditions added to the program for several years now.

Read moreTwo New Qualifying Conditions Added to New Mexico’s Medical Cannabis Program