Georgia Medical Marijuana Bill Signed Into Law by Governor

Georgia’s governor has signed into law a measure that significantly expands the state’s limited medical marijuana law.

Governor Nathan Deal signed Senate Bill 16 into law today, roughly a month and a week after it was passed by the full legislature; it passed the Senate with a 45 to 6 vote, and was passed by the House of Representatives with a vote of 167 to 4 vote

The new law greatly expands the list of conditions that qualify an individual to legally use low-THC marijuana medicines (such as oils and tinctures) to include Tourette’s Syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, epidermolysis bullosa, Alzheimer’s disease, AIDS (when “such syndrome is diagnosed as severe or end stage”) and peripheral neuropathy.

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Georgia Legislature Passes Medical Marijuana Bill, Sends it to Governor

Legislation significantly expanding Georgia’s medical marijuana law has been passed by the state’s full legislature.

The Senate passed Senate Bill 16 today with a 45 to 6 vote, just a couple days after it was passed by the House of Representatives with a 167 to 4 vote. It has now been sent to Governor Nathan Deal for consideration.

If signed into law by Governor Deal, or allowed to become law without his signature, it would expand the list of conditions that qualify an individual to legally use cannabis-based medicines to include Tourette’s Syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, epidermolysis bullosa, Alzheimer’s disease, AIDS (when “such syndrome is diagnosed as severe or end stage”) and peripheral neuropathy.

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Georgia House Passes Medical Cannabis Expansion Measure with 167 to 4 Vote

Georgia’s full House of Representatives has voted to expand the state’s medical cannabis law.

Senate Bill 16 was passed by the House today with a 167 to 4 vote; the proposal has already been passed by the full Senate.

The proposed law would expand the list of conditions that qualify an individual to legally use cannabis-based medicines to include Tourette’s Syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, epidermolysis bullosa, Alzheimer’s disease, AIDS (when “such syndrome is diagnosed as severe or end stage”) and peripheral neuropathy.

These conditions would join cancer, ALS, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, mitochondrial disease, Parkinson’s disease and sickle cell disease as qualifying medical cannabis conditions.

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Georgia Medical Marijuana Bill Passed by House Committee

A key House committee has given approval to a Georgia bill that would greatly expand the state’s medical marijuana program.

Senate Bill 16 would expand a 2015 law that allows for the medical use of cannabis oil by adding six new conditions that qualify someone to become a legal medical cannabis patient. Those conditions are AIDS, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, epidermolysis bullosa, Tourette’s syndrome and peripheral neuropathy.

The bill would also make some other changes, including removing a one-year residency requirement for those wanting to become patients, and altering a quarterly reporting requirement by physicians to a bi-yearly report. Another change is that it allows those from out-of-state to be covered by Georgia’s medical marijuana law for up to 45 days if they are a patient in their home state and have a condition that Georgia’s law covers.

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Georgia Senate Committee Passes Bill to Greatly Reduce Marijuana Possession Penalties

Georgia’s Senate Judiciary Committee has passed a measure that would significantly reduce the penalties associated with possessing small amounts of marijuana.

Senate Bill 105, filed by Senator Harold Jones (D), would reduce the penalty associated with possessing up to a half ounce of cannabis from a potential one year prison sentence, to a maximum fine of $300 with no jail time.

The measure would also alter the penalty for possessing one to two ounces of cannabis.

Under current law possessing over an ounce of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison (with a mandatory sentence of a year). Senate Bill 105 would make it so that possessing one to two ounces is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail (as would possessing half an ounce to an ounce).

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Georgia House Passes Medical Marijuana Bill

Georgia’s full House of Representatives has passed a bill that would significantly expand a medical marijuana law passed in 2015.

House Bill 65, sponsored by State Representative Allen Peake (R), was passed with an overwhelming 156 to 6 vote. The measure would expand a law passed in 2015 that allows for the medical use of low-THC cannabis medicines like tinctures and oils to include Alzheimer’s disease, autism, HIV/AIDS, autoimmune disease, Tourette’s syndrome epidermolysis bullosa and peripheral neuropathy as qualifying conditions.

The bill approved by the House would remove a one-year residency requirement for those wanting to become a medical cannabis patient. It would also allow those with medical cannabis cards from other states to legally possess and use the medicine in Georgia.

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Georgia Marijuana Possession Laws

Georgia Marijuana Possession LawsGeorgia Marijuana Possession Laws:

 

1 ounce or less:

Penalty: Misdemeanor with up to 1 year in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000.

 

More than 1 ounce:

Penalty: Felony with 1 to 10 years in prison (1 year mandatory minimum) and a maximum fine of $5,000.

 

For further information on Georgia marijuana laws – including penalties for distribution and cultivation – click here. For recent updates to Georgia marijuana possession laws and other Georgia–related stories, click here.

 

Clarkston, Georgia Decriminalizes Cannabis

(Photo: townmapusa.com)
(Photo: townmapusa.com)

An ordinance that will decriminalize the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis has been given approval by the Clarkston, Georgia City Council. It has the support of the city’s mayor, meaning it will be quickly passed into law.

Under the new law, those caught possessing up to an ounce of cannabis will be given a maximum fine of $75; under current Clarkston law, the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis is punishable by a misdemeanor and up to a year in jail (in addition to a potential $1,000 fine).

“It is a proven fact that arresting people for simple possession of an once or less of marijuana has damaging effects long-term and short-term on their lives,” says Mario Williams, Public Safety Committee chairman for the Clarkson City Council. “And that’s why we took a step forward and mitigated those effects today.”

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Georgia: Legislation to Decriminalize Cannabis Introduced

georgiaGeorgia State Representative LaDawn Jones (D-Atlanta), along with three cosponsors, has introduced legislation to decriminalize the possession of up to an ounce of cannabis.

Under the proposed law – House Bill 1046 – those caught possessing up to an ounce of cannabis in Georgia would no longer be arrested and charged with a criminal misdemeanor that carries a jail sentence of up to a year. Instead, a ticket of no more than $250 could be administered for a first offense, $500 for a second offense and $750 for a third and subsequent offense. No number of offenses would result in jail time.

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Georgia’s High Court Rules Imprisonment for Cannabis Possession is Unconstitutional

iowabudIn the case of Beka Tsikarishvili v. Parliament (application 592), the Constitutional Court of Georgia has ruled that it’s unconstitutional to imprison someone for purchasing and possessing cannabis for personal use.

In 2013, Beka Tsikarish was arrested and charged for purchasing and having in her possession 65 grams of cannabis. The court ruled that imprisoning her violates Article 17 § 2 of Georgia’s Constitution, which states that; “No one shall be subjected to torture, cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment”.

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