Study Says “CBD Shows Similar Efficacy in the Severe Pediatric Epilepsies to Other Antiepileptic Drugs”

Cannabidiol (CBD) “shows similar efficacy in the severe paediatric epilepsies to other antiepileptic drugs”,  states a new meta-study published by the journal Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, and epublished by the National Institute of Health.”

“There are hundreds of compounds found in the marijuana plant, each contributing differently to the antiepileptic and psychiatric effects”, states the study’s abstract. “Despite considerable community interest in the use of CBD for paediatric epilepsy, there has been little evidence for its use apart from anecdotal reports, until the last year. ” Researchers note that “Three randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials in Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome found that CBD produced a 38% to 41% median reduction in all seizures compared to 13% to 19% on placebo.”

Similarly, “CBD resulted in a 39% to 46% responder rate (50% convulsive or drop-seizure reduction) compared to 14% to 27% on placebo. CBD was well tolerated; however, sedation, diarrhoea, and decreased appetite were frequent.”

Read moreStudy Says “CBD Shows Similar Efficacy in the Severe Pediatric Epilepsies to Other Antiepileptic Drugs”

Study: Cannabis Could Represent an Effective and Well-Tolerated Treatment for Epileptic Seizures

According to a new study published by Epilepsia Open, “cannabis could actually represent an effective, well-tolerated antiepileptic drug”.

“Cannabidivarin (CBDV) and cannabidiol (CBD) have recently emerged among cannabinoids for their potential antiepileptic properties, as shown in several animal models”, states the study’s abstract. “We report the case of a patient affected by symptomatic partial epilepsy who used cannabis as self-medication after the failure of countless pharmacological/surgical treatments.”

Clinical and video electroencephalogram (EEG) evaluations were periodically performed, and the serum levels of CBDV, CBD, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol were repeatedly measured. After cannabis administration, “a dramatic clinical improvement, in terms of both decrease in seizure frequency and recovery of cognitive functions, was observed, which might parallel high CBDV plasma concentrations.”

Read moreStudy: Cannabis Could Represent an Effective and Well-Tolerated Treatment for Epileptic Seizures

Study: 90% of Adults Who Use Marijuana to Treat Epilepsy Find Success

According to a new Australian study published by the journal Epilepsy Behavior, and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health, a vast majority of those who use marijuana to treat epilepsy (including parents who administer it to their children) find success in doing so.

For the study; “Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy.” The survey “consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy.”

A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results showed that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy.

Read moreStudy: 90% of Adults Who Use Marijuana to Treat Epilepsy Find Success