Study: Elevated THC Blood Levels Persist for Days in Habitual Cannabis Consumers

By Paul Armentano, NORML

VICTORIA, AUSTRALIAblood — The presence of THC may persist in the blood of habitual cannabis consumers for multiple days at concentrations above 5ng/ml, according clinical data recently published in the journal Forensic Science International.

Australian researchers assessed daily concentrations of THC in the blood of 21 subjects over a period of 7 days of monitored abstinence. Subjects reported having engaging in the “heavy” use of cannabis during the months leading up to the study.

Read moreStudy: Elevated THC Blood Levels Persist for Days in Habitual Cannabis Consumers

Nevada Bill Would Legalize Medical Cannabis for Pets, Remove Per Se Cannabis DUID Law

Companion Cannabis, a medical cannabis tincture for dogs and cats by Holistic Therapeutics. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
Companion Cannabis, a medical cannabis tincture for dogs and cats by California-based Holistic Therapeutics. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

Legislation that would make several changes to Nevada’s medical cannabis law has been introduced in the state’s Legislature. One of the changes the bill would make is to allow pets to use medical cannabis obtained by their owners, and to alter a law that finds a person guilty of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) if they’re caught driving with THC in their system.

Senate Bill 372, sponsored by Senator Tick Segerblom, would allow animal owners to obtain medical cannabis on behalf of their pets if a veterinarian certifies that an animal has an illness that might be helped by the medicine. This would make Nevada the first state in the nation to officially legalize medical cannabis for animals.

Read moreNevada Bill Would Legalize Medical Cannabis for Pets, Remove Per Se Cannabis DUID Law

Zero Tolerance Driving Policy for Cannabis Struck Down by Arizona Supreme Court

By Associated Press

Authorities can’t prosecute Arizona motorists for driving under the influence of marijuana unless the person is impaired at the time of the stop, the state Supreme Court ruled Tuesdaygavel in the latest opinion on an issue that several states have grappled with across the nation.

The ruling overturned a state Court of Appeals decision last year that upheld the right of authorities to prosecute pot smokers for DUI even when there is no evidence of impairment.

The opinion focuses on two chemical compounds in marijuana that show up in blood and urine tests — one that causes impairment and one that doesn’t but stays in a pot user’s system for weeks.

Read moreZero Tolerance Driving Policy for Cannabis Struck Down by Arizona Supreme Court