Study: Evidence Fails to Support DUI Impairment Levels for Cannabis

By Paul Armentano, NORML

WASHINGTON, DC — Available science fails to support the imposition of driving under thedriving influence (DUI) impairment thresholds for cannabis in a manner that is analogous to the per se limits already in place for alcohol, according to the conclusions of a November 2014 publication published by the United States Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Per se traffic safety laws criminalize those who operate a vehicle with trace or specific levels of a controlled substance in their bodily fluids, even in the absence of any further evidence indicating that the subject was behaviorally impaired.

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Zero Tolerance Driving Policy for Cannabis Struck Down by Arizona Supreme Court

By Associated Press

Authorities can’t prosecute Arizona motorists for driving under the influence of marijuana unless the person is impaired at the time of the stop, the state Supreme Court ruled Tuesdaygavel in the latest opinion on an issue that several states have grappled with across the nation.

The ruling overturned a state Court of Appeals decision last year that upheld the right of authorities to prosecute pot smokers for DUI even when there is no evidence of impairment.

The opinion focuses on two chemical compounds in marijuana that show up in blood and urine tests — one that causes impairment and one that doesn’t but stays in a pot user’s system for weeks.

Read moreZero Tolerance Driving Policy for Cannabis Struck Down by Arizona Supreme Court

New NIDA Study: THC Blood Levels Do Not Accurately Measure Intoxication

A new study from the National Institute on Drug Abuse has offered revealing information on the perceived correlation between cannabis consumption rates and THC blood concentration levels.Gloved-hands-with-blood-vial-300x200

Researchers examined the blood and plasma levels of both frequent and occasional cannabis consumers, before and after smoking. Frequent and occasional smokers resided on a closed research unit and smoked one 6.8% THC cannabis cigarette. Blood and plasma cannabinoids were quantified on admission (approximately 19 hours before), 1 hour before, and up to 15 times (0.5–30 hours) after smoking.

Read moreNew NIDA Study: THC Blood Levels Do Not Accurately Measure Intoxication