50 Years Ago Today, Martin Luther King Jr. Announced His Dream; The Drug War Wasn’t Part of It

50 years ago today, thousands marched on Washington and watched the inspiring Martin Luther King Jr. announce that he has “a dream”; a dream of equality, and a dream of a better future for his friends and family.Martin-Luther-King-Jr-9365086-2-402

Although we’ve made tremendous strides since that speech, one can’t help but wonder what Mr. King would think of our current drug war, which has become a massive cycle of institutional racism, trapping minorities in a system which harshly criminalizes simple drug possession, creating perpetual criminals in the process by removing opportunities for housing, education and work, leading many to a life of crime just to “get by”.

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Reminder: Juries Can Nullify Charges they Find Unjust

Although its usage is increasing in the American legal system, far too few people know about, and understand one of the biggest weapons we have in our civil-rights arsenal; jury nullification. 588x280xIM_fija_billboard1.jpg.pagespeed.ic.9dL7FwxKb7

Jury nullification is a practice that dates back to before our nation was formed, and is the act of a jury acquitting someone of a charge, even if the evidence is clear, by finding them “not guilty”. By doing so, people can make sure that an individual doesn’t fall victim to unjust, archaic laws. As a juror, taking this path is simple: Vote “not guilty” to someone who is being charged with a bad law. A bad law being something like, say, cannabis prohibition.
Or most non-violent convictions made under the drug war.

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