DEA Eases Requirements for Clinical Trials on Cannabidiol

cbdThe United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has announced in a press release sent today that they’ve eased some of the regulatory requirements imposed by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) for those who are conducting FDA-approved clinical trials on cannabidiol (CBD), an extract of the cannabis plant.  These modifications will streamline the research process regarding CBD’s possible medicinal value and help foster ongoing scientific studies. The DEA notified affected researchers by letter of the changes, which take effect immediately.

“Federal Regulation (21 CFR 1301.18) requires researchers conducting CBD-based clinical trials under an FDA Investigational New Drug Application to have a DEA research registration”, the DEA states in their press release. “This registration permits the possession of an approved amount of CBD for a specific research protocol.  Prior to now, researchers who expanded the scope of their studies and needed more CBD than initially approved for had to request, in writing, a modification to their DEA research registrations – potentially delaying that research while the modification underwent an approval process that includes both the DEA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).”

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Senators Push Feds to Ease Restrictions on Cannabis Research

By Sarah Ferris, TheHill.com

purpleplantSen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) wants to make it easier for government-paid researchers to study marijuana – and not just its negative side effects.

Eight Democratic senators, led by Warren, are urging federal health and drug officials to address the “data shortfall” on potential health benefits of medical marijuana by making it easier for researchers to study the drug.

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President Obama Takes Huge Step in Clearing Way for More Cannabis Research

plantPresident Obama made a major change on Monday that will make it easier for those wanting to cultivate cannabis for research purposes.

Obama has eliminated the Public health Service review requirement for those attempting to grow cannabis for the purposes of researching the plant. Created in 1999, the Public Health Service review is a process established by the federal government for those wanting to research cannabis who aren’t directly funded by the government.

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New Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research Journal Launching in the Fall

Cannabis cannabiscuresnauseaand Cannabinoid Research, a new peer-reviewed, open access journal, will launch this fall as the world’s first journal dedicated to the scientific, medical, and psychosocial exploration of clinical cannabis, cannabinoids, and the biochemical mechanisms of endocannabinoids.

“Launching in fall 2015, the Journal will be the premier open source for authoritative cannabis and cannabinoid research, discussion, and debate” states a recent press release from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing company behind the new journal, which will be published “under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 (CC BY) license to ensure broad dissemination and participation.”

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Government to Give University of Mississippi $68.8 Million to Grow and Study Cannabis

The Nationalum Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has awarded the University of Mississippi $68.8 million to grow and analyze cannabis.

The money will go to a cannabis research lab at the university, which is the sole producer of cannabis used for federal research. The project is expected to lead to the cultivation of at least 30,000 plants.

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U.S. Scientists Can Soon Run Experiments on Stronger Cannabis than Previously Allowed, Says NIDA

By Arielle Duhaime-Ross, The Verge

Scientists whomarijuana3 study medical marijuana will soon have access to a wider variety of strains. The National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) — the federal “dealer” that supplies the drug to scientists — has received numerous complaints from researchers that the drug they supply is too weak compared with what’s sold on the streets, legal or otherwise. But the complaints aren’t responsible for the change, Nature reports. NIDA’s willingness to expand the types of plants available to researchers is tied to the fact that legal marijuana is becoming increasingly available.

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Top 10 Cannabis Studies of 2014

2014 has purplebeen an incredible year for the cannabis reform movement, with two more states, several cities and the District of Columbia voting in favor of legalization. In addition, it’s been an excellent year for cannabis science, with numerous studies being released that demonstrate its medical potential and diversity, and the benefits of its legalization. Below we breakdown what we believe to be the top 10 cannabis studies of 2014.

 

1. Painkiller Overdose Deaths Drop as Much as 50% in States Where Medical Cannabis is Legal

A study published by the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine in January found that states that have legalized medical cannabis have seen a drastic reduction in opioid overdose mortality rates. According to the study; “States with medical cannabis laws had a 24.8% lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate compared with states without medical cannabis laws.” Researchers note that the reduction was almost immediate, as every state that legalized medical cannabis saw a dramatic decrease in opioid overdose deaths within the first year (averaging about 20% less). The decline continued each year after. By the 5th year, states had experienced a decrease in opioid deaths ranging up to 50.9%.

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Colorado Agrees to Fund Over $8 Million in Cannabis Studies

The Colorado Board of Health has given approval tojilly-bean-medical-marijuana-weed-strain-thcf-jillybeanweed over $8 million in state-funded research on the benefits of medical cannabis. The studies will examine whether cannabis can treat a variety of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and pediatric brain tumors.

“This is new and uncharted territory,” says Dr. Larry Wolk, Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Dr. Suzanne Sisley, a psychiatrist who will help run one of the approved studies which will focus on the possibility of cannabis treating PTSD, agrees; “This is the first time we’ve had government money to look at the efficacy of marijuana, not the harms of marijuana”.

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