California Officials Say Cannabis Deliveries Can Be Made Anywhere, Even in Cities Where Marijuana is Banned

California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control said on Friday that marijuana deliveries can be made anywhere in the state, even in localities that ban marijuana businesses.

The issue has been one of the most debated issues as state regulators hammer out permanent rules for how marijuana is grown, tested, packaged and delivered, reports the Associated Press. Law enforcement groups and the California League of Cities opposed the move.

The delivery issue was included in regulations drafted by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, which issues most retail permits. The rules will become law in 30 days unless California’s Office of Administrative Law objects.

Read moreCalifornia Officials Say Cannabis Deliveries Can Be Made Anywhere, Even in Cities Where Marijuana is Banned

California Marijuana Laws 2018

California Marijuana Laws 2018

California Marijuana Laws 2018

California marijuana laws have changed drastically over the past few years. In 2016, voters approved Proposition 64. This legalized marijuana for everyone 21 and older. This includes allowing marijuana to be possessed, cultivated and also purchased. The passage of this law came 20 years after California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana in 1996.

Here is an overview of California marijuana laws:

 

Recreational marijuana:

  • It’s legal for those 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana, as well as up to eight grams of marijuana concentrates.
  • It’s legal for those 21 and older to grow up to six marijuana plants.
  • Possessing as well as growing marijuana for those under 21 is an infraction.

 

Medical marijuana:

  • Possessing up to eight ounces of marijuana, as well as up to eight grams of marijuana concentrates, is legal for patients.
  • Growing up to six mature, as well as 12 immature marijuana plants, is legal for patients.
  • When purchasing marijuana patients are exempt from the state sales tax.

 

Marijuana distribution:

  • Distributing marijuana is legal for businesses with a license from the state as well as their locality.
  • Marijuana retail outlets can sell up to an ounce of marijuana and up to eight grams of marijuana concentrates such as oils.
  • Selling marijuana without a license  is illegal.

 

Related Statutes:

  • Business & Professions Code Sections 26000, et seq, as well as;
  • Health & Safety Code Sections 11000, et seq.; 11357, et seq.; 11362.7, et seq.

 

Proposition 64:

Proposition 64 legalized marijuana. Its approval took place in November, 2016. Fifty seven percent voted in favor of the initiative. Parts of the law took effect immediately, with other parts taking effect over the following several months.

The full text of Proposition 64 can be found by clicking here.

 

In 1996 Proposition 215 passed in California with roughly 56% support. The initiative made California the first state in the nation to legalize medical marijuana. Because of this, 30 additional states have followed.

More information on Proposition 215 can be found by clicking  here.

Medical Cannabis for Pets Bill Passed by California Senate, Already Passed Assembly

California’s Assembly and Senate have both approved legislation that would explicitly allow and regulate the medical use of cannabis for pets.

Assembly Bill 2215 was given approval by the full Senate Tuesday in a 37 to 1 vote, roughly three months after the Assembly passed it 60 to 10.  Although it has already passed the Assembly it will need to go back for one final vote to concur with Senate changes before it can be sent to Governor Jerry Brown for consideration.

Assembly Bill 2215 would expand “the intent of the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) to control and regulate cannabis and cannabis products for medicinal use on pets.” It would define “cannabis products” to include products intended for medicinal use on a pet, and although it wouldn’t allow a veterinarian to administer medical cannabis, it  would “allow a veterinarian to discuss the use of cannabis on an animal for medicinal purposes without being disciplined or denied, revoked or suspended by the Veterinary Medical Board (VMB).”

Read moreMedical Cannabis for Pets Bill Passed by California Senate, Already Passed Assembly

Study: Just 1 in 7 California Cities Allow Marijuana Stores

According to a newly-released study conducted by The Mercury News, just one out of every seven cities in California allow marijuana retail outlets, despite voters approving of legalization nearly a year and a half ago.

In 2016 California voters, with a 57% majority, gave approval to Proposition 64. The initiative legalized the possession and personal cultivation of marijuana, while establishing a system of licensed marijuana retail outlets. Despite the entire state passing the law, numerous cities – through ordinances passed by their city council – have establishes bans on all marijuana stores, requiring  marijuana consumers to either travel long distances to purchase the plant legally, or rely on the black market.

“Our study is the most comprehensive look to date at how the industry is taking shape”, states The Mercury News. “Some towns — among them San Jose and Oakland — are cannabis friendly, allowing a wide range of businesses to cultivate or peddle a product that residents are free to use. Other cities — including many smaller jurisdictions across the Bay Area — are less enthusiastic, with some blocking virtually every type of marijuana-related enterprise and, in some cases, passing ordinances that seem aimed at regulating personal use as much as possible, despite the voters’ will.”

Read moreStudy: Just 1 in 7 California Cities Allow Marijuana Stores

California Bill Would Automatically Expunge Past Marijuana Convictions

California Assemblymember Rob Bonta (D-Oakland) has introduced legislation that would require county courts to automatically expunge the records of those who have been charged with a marijuana-related crime that’s since been legalized, reports Kathleen Ronayne of the Associated Press.

In 2016 California voters approved the ability to wipe criminal marijuana conviction records as a provision in the legalization initiative Proposition 64. However, the existing law requires people with convictions to initiate the process themselves, but many people don’t (often because they don’t know they can, as the option has received little publicity) For some, the process is simply to complicated and costly. Although roughly 5,000 people have applied for an expungement as of 2017, it’s only a small portion of the total number of people eligible.

The proposed law would change this, requiring that these eligible charges be expunged from people’s records automatically. This would remove the requirement that an individual themselves seek an expungement. According to Bonta, the proposal would “give folks who deserve it under the law the fresh start they’re entitled to”.

Read moreCalifornia Bill Would Automatically Expunge Past Marijuana Convictions

Lawmaker Renews Push to Make California a Sanctuary State for Marijuana

Assemblymemver Reggie Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles) is renewing his effort to get legislation passed into law that would make California a sanctuary state for marijuana.

The renewed effort comes after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that he’s rescinding the Obama-era Cole Memo which gave some protection to state-authorized cannabis outlets. Assemblymember Jones-Sawyer’s proposal, Assembly Bill 1578, was approved by the state’s Assembly in June by a vote of 41 to 33. Later that month it was approved by a Senate committee 5 to 2, but has since stalled.

“The impacts of this ill-conceived and poorly executed war are still being felt by communities of color across the state,” Assemblymember Jones-Sawyer said in a statement. “The last time California supported the federal government’s efforts, families were torn apart and critical state resources were used to incarcerate more black and brown people than ever before in the history of our state.”

Read moreLawmaker Renews Push to Make California a Sanctuary State for Marijuana

California: Legal Marijuana Sales Begin in Four Days

In just four days the legal distribution of recreational marijuana will begin in California.

During the November, 2016 election California voters chose to legalize marijuana, including establishing a system of licenses cannabis retail outlets, through the passage of Proposition 64. In just four days, the initiative goes into full effect, with licensed distribution becoming legal on January 1st.

The new law allows outlets with a state-issued license to distribute up to an ounce of cannabis for those 21 and older. Although most marijuana stores won’t be open on January 1st, the California Bureau of Cannabis Control (CBCC) has been issuing temporary licenses to certain businesses, including currently operating dispensaries, allowing  them to begin sales at 6am on Monday.

Read moreCalifornia: Legal Marijuana Sales Begin in Four Days

First Recreational Marijuana Business Licenses Issued in California

Yesterday California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control issued the first licenses for recreational marijuana businesses, paving the way for legal marijuana sales to begin the beginning of next year.

“This is a great Christmas present,” said California NORML director Dale Gieringer. “Licensing is an inevitable necessity of the modern bureaucratic state. I’m just happy to see the stores open and people be able to walk into a store — any adult including tourists and guests in California — and get cannabis just like they can get alcohol, cigarettes or all sorts of wonderful things in California.”

Altogether 20 licenses were issued to cannabis businesses located throughout the state, including multiple located in San Diego, Lynwood and San Jose. The most – seven in total – are located in Santa Cruz.

Read moreFirst Recreational Marijuana Business Licenses Issued in California

Marijuana Sales Becomes Legal in California Next Month

We’re now just a month away from marijuana distribution becoming legal in California.

During the November, 2016 elections California voters approved an initiative (Proposition 64) to legalize marijuana for everyone 21 and older,. The portion of the initiative that allows for the start of marijuana distribution officially takes effect the beginning of next month, on January 1st. Under the new law, those 21 and older will be allowed to purchase up to an ounce of marijuana from a license marijuana retail outlet. However, at this point it’s unknown how many outlets will actually be open coming the new year.

“I know this sounds crazy, but we’re looking forward to Jan. 1,” says Lori Ajax, head of the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. “This is what we’ve been waiting for, what we’ve been training for,” she said. “It’s time.”

Read moreMarijuana Sales Becomes Legal in California Next Month

California CBD Bill Passes Two Committees Unanimously

Cannabidiol (CBD) legislation in California has been passed by two Assembly committees, both unanimously.

Assembly Bill 845 was passed earlier this month by the Assembly Health Committee, and on Wednesday was given approval by the Assembly Appropriations Committee; both committees passed the bill unanimously with a combined vote of 30 to 0.

According to the proposal; “Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, classifies controlled substances into 5 designated schedules, with the most restrictive limitations generally placed on controlled substances classified in Schedule I, and the least restrictive limitations generally placed on controlled substances classified in Schedule V. Existing law places marijuana in Schedule I. Cannabidiol is a compound found in marijuana.” Existing law also “restricts the prescription, furnishing, possession, sale, and use of controlled substances, including marijuana and synthetic cannabinoid compounds, and makes a violation of those laws a crime, except as specified.”

Read moreCalifornia CBD Bill Passes Two Committees Unanimously