British Medical Journal: Drugs Should be Legalized, Regulated, and Taxed

The British Medical Journal (BMJ) has released a paper explaining why they are “firmly behind efforts to legalise, regulate, and tax the sale of drugs for recreational and medicinal use.”

“The war on drugs costs each UK taxpayer an estimated £400 a year”, states the BMJ. “The UK is now the world’s largest exporter of legal cannabis, yet recreational and medicinal use are criminalised. Scotland has the EU’s highest rate of drug related deaths, double that of 10 years ago.” They state that “The global trade in illicit drugs is worth £236bn, but this money fuels organised crime and human misery. Why should it not instead fund public services?”

According to the BMJ, “A growing number of countries are taking a more enlightened route,… In Portugal, where non-violent possession of drugs has been decriminalised, consumption hasn’t increased but drug related deaths have fallen considerably. In the Netherlands, the USA, and now Canada, regulated markets for the sale of cannabis generate substantial tax revenues.”

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Study: Kids with High Academic Scores More Likely to Use Cannabis, Less Likely to Smoke Cigarettes

New research has found that adolescents with high academic scores are considerably more likely to consume cannabis than those with low scores.

The study was published by the British Medical Journal. According to its abstract, the study’s aim “was to determine the association between childhood academic ability and the onset and persistence of tobacco, alcohol and cannabis use across adolescence in a representative sample of English schools pupils.” Researchers wanted to conduct the study because “Previous research has produced conflicting findings.”

For the study, data from “7 years of the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE)” was used; in total there were 6,059 participants “with information on academic ability around age 11 and health behaviours from age 13/14 to 16/17 (early adolescence) and from age 18/19 to 19/20 (late adolescence).” Researchers used “Self-completion questionnaires during home visits, face-to-face interviews and web-based questionnaires” to determine the results.

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New Study Confirms What We Already Know: The Drug War Has Failed

A new study published by the British Medical Journal has found that drugs are cheaper and purer than ever before, despite an increase in drug seizures, indicating that the drug war has been a complete failure.drugwarpicture2

According to researchers; “With few exceptions and despite increasing investments in enforcement-based supply reduction efforts aimed at disrupting global drug supply, illegal drug prices have generally decreased while drug purity has generally increased since 1990. These findings suggest that expanding efforts at controlling the global illegal drug market through law enforcement are failing.”

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