Study: CBD Could Prevent Haloperidol-Induced Orofacial Dyskinesia

Cannabidiol (CBD) may prevent haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia, according  to new research being published by the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity; the research was epublished by the National Institute of Health.

“The chronic use of drugs that reduce the dopaminergic neurotransmission can cause a hyperkinetic movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia (TD)”, states the study’s abstract. “The pathophysiology of this disorder is not entirely understood but could involve oxidative and neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychotomimetic compound present in Cannabis sativa plant, could be a possible therapeutic alternative for TD.”

The study states that “This phytocannabinoid shows antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antipsychotic properties and decreases the acute motor effects of classical antipsychotics. The present study investigated if CBD would attenuate orofacial dyskinesia, oxidative stress and inflammatory changes induced by chronic administration of haloperidol in mice.”

Read moreStudy: CBD Could Prevent Haloperidol-Induced Orofacial Dyskinesia

Study: Daily Cannabis Use Has No Effect on Brain Volume or Shape

A new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience has found that daily cannabis use has no effect on the volume or shape of an individual’s brain.brain

For the study, researchers at the University of Colorado “examined brain morphology in a sample of adult daily marijuana users versus nonusers and a sample of adolescent daily users versus nonusers. ”

Researchers “acquired high-resolution MRI scans, and investigated group differences in gray matter using voxel-based morphometry, surface-based morphometry, and shape analysis in structures suggested to be associated with marijuana use, as follows: the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus, and cerebellum.”

Read moreStudy: Daily Cannabis Use Has No Effect on Brain Volume or Shape

New Study: Cannabis May Help Heal the Brain After Injury

A new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex has found evidence that activation of the body’s cannabinoid receptors mayoriginal lead to neuroprotective benefits which can help heal the brain after a traumatic injury.

According to researchers for the study; “The results provided the first evidence for the involvement of ECS [endocannabinoid system] in the neuroprotective action of minocycline on brain edema, neurological impairment, diffuse axonal injury, and microglial activation, since all these effects were prevented by the CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.”

Read moreNew Study: Cannabis May Help Heal the Brain After Injury