Arizona Supreme Court Rules Lawmakers Can’t Ban Medical Cannabis Access on College Campuses

The Arizona Supreme Court has ruled that state lawmakers cannot prohibit the access of medical cannabis on college campuses.

In the case of Arizona v Maestas (No. CR-17-0193-PR), the Arizona Supreme Court upheld an appellate court decision which struck down a 2012 law that prohibited medical cannabis access on college campuses. The ruling sets immediate precedent across the state.

NORML Legal Committee member Tom Dean, who represented the patient-defendant in the case pro bono, called the decision a “victory for democracy.”

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Arizona Supreme Court Rules Cannabis Legalization Initiative Will Be On November Ballot

Arizona Supreme CourtThe Arizona Supreme Court has put the final nail in the coffin (to state a cliche) of those trying to prevent a cannabis legalization initiative (Proposition 205) from being voting on this November. The highest court rejected a lawsuit by Arizonans for Responsible Drug Policy calling on the initiative to be removed from the November ballot.

According to opponents of the measure, it should be removed from the 2016 general election ballot because petitions that were signed by voters left out provisions, had a misleading title, and proponents allegedly failed to be transparent about revenue sources. The court rejected all of these complaints, stating that the group behind the initiative did everything legal in gathering enough signatures to make the ballot.

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Arizona Supreme Court Rules Medical Cannabis Allowed While on Probation

The Arizonanewamericanmedia.org Supreme Court on Tuesday issued two rulings prohibiting courts and prosecutors from denying medical cannabis use as a term of probation, provided that the individual has a valid medical cannabis card.

In one case, a man was convicted of possessing cannabis with the intent to sell, and was banned from using cannabis by his probation officer once he was released from prison.

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Zero Tolerance Driving Policy for Cannabis Struck Down by Arizona Supreme Court

By Associated Press

Authorities can’t prosecute Arizona motorists for driving under the influence of marijuana unless the person is impaired at the time of the stop, the state Supreme Court ruled Tuesdaygavel in the latest opinion on an issue that several states have grappled with across the nation.

The ruling overturned a state Court of Appeals decision last year that upheld the right of authorities to prosecute pot smokers for DUI even when there is no evidence of impairment.

The opinion focuses on two chemical compounds in marijuana that show up in blood and urine tests — one that causes impairment and one that doesn’t but stays in a pot user’s system for weeks.

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U.S. Supreme Court: Arizona Police Must Return Cannabis to California Patient

In a ruling handed down without comment, the United States Supreme Court has refused to overturn prior court rulings stating that the Yuma County Sheriff gavelmust return cannabis that was seized from a California patient. Arizona’s medical cannabis law is one of the only in the country that legally recognizes patients from other states.

The ruling came as a response to a case where Valerie Okun, a qualified medical cannabis patient in California, had cannabis seized by a border patrol agent in Yuma County, in 2011. She was charged with cannabis possession, with the charges eventually being dropped when she provided proof of being a medical cannabis patient. However, police refused to return the seized cannabis, even after an Arizona Supreme Court ruling.

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