Study: Cannabinoids Attenuate Hyperactivity and Weight Loss in Anorexia

According to a new study, cannabinoids can attenuate (reduce the effects of) hyperactivity and body weight loss in activity-based anorexia.

The study, published by the British Journal of Pharmacology, was epublished ahead of print by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

“Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric condition characterized by excessive body weight loss and disturbed perceptions of body shape and size, often associated with excessive physical activity”, states the study’s abstract. “There is currently no effective drug-related therapy of this disease and this leads to high relapse rate. Clinical data suggest that a promising therapy to treat and reduce reoccurrence of AN may be based on the use of drugs that target the endocannabinoid (EC) system [such as cannabinoids], which appears dysregulated in AN patients.”

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Legislation to Legalize Medical Marijuana Passed by Full West Virginia Senate

Medical marijuana would be legal under a bill approved today by West Virginia’s full Senate.

Substitute Senate Bill 386 was passed through its third and final reading today with a 28 to 6 vote, sending it to the House of Representatives. Passage in the House would send it to Governor Jim Justice for consideration.

The proposed legislation would legalize medical marijuana possession and use for those with a qualifying condition who receive a doctor recommendation. The West Virginia Medical Cannabis Commission would be created to oversee a regulated and licensed system of cannabis cultivation centers and dispensaries. Dispensaries would be authorized to distribute cannabis and cannabis products to qualifying patients.

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Study: Cannabis Show Promise in Treatment of Anorexia

By Liam Davenport, Medscape.com (republished with special permission)

anorexia
(Photo: YouthVoices.net).

Impairments in the endocannabinoid system in the brain could play an important role in the development of anorexia nervosa, say Italian researchers, who report findings that point to novel cannabis-based therapeutic strategies for the eating disorder.

In a mouse model of anorexia, the team found not only that the density of cannabinoid receptors was significantly reduced in areas associated with appetite but also that administration of receptor agonists led to increases in body weight and a reduction in interest in exercise.

Roberto Collu, a PhD student in the Division of Neuroscience and Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Calgiari, Italy, told delegates here at the 29th European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) Congress that “pharmacological therapies based on drugs that modulate endocannabinoid system signaling might be useful in the treatment of anorexia nervosa.”

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Dysfunctional Endocannabinoid System May Lead to Eating Disorders

A recent study published by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging as well as the National Institute of Health has found evidence to suggest that a dysfunctional endocannabinoid systemEndocannabinoid-System-1-750x563 may lead to eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. These results indicate that cannabis may be an effective treatment for these types of disorders, given that it naturally activates and heals our body’s cannabinoid receptors.

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Cannabis Could be Key to Treating Anorexia, According to Study

A new study published by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging has found that anorexia causes a “widespread transient disturbance” in the body’s endocannabinoid system, indicating that cannabcannabisis consumption could solve much of the problem by fixing this disturbance.

According to the study’s abstract; “Using [18F]MK-9470 and small animal positron emission tomography (PET), we investigated for the first time cerebral changes in type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor binding in vivo in the activity-based rat model of anorexia (ABA), in comparison to distinct motor- and food-related control conditions and in relation to gender and behavioural variables.”

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