Alcohol Use Increases Aggression, Cannabis Use Decreases It, Finds Study

A study published in the most recent issue of the journal Psychopharmacology has found that alcohol significantly increases aggression whileaggression cannabis significantly decreases it. The study was a random controlled trial, typically refereed to as the “gold standard” for research studies.

“This study investigated the acute effects of alcohol and cannabis on subjective aggression in alcohol and cannabis users, respectively, following aggression exposure”, states the study’s abstract.” “Drug-free controls served as a reference.”

Prior to conducting the study, researchers hypothesized that “aggression exposure would increase subjective aggression in alcohol users during alcohol intoxication, whereas it was expected to decrease subjective aggression in cannabis users during cannabis intoxication.”

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New Study Concludes Cannabis Use Doesn’t Cause Aggression

A new study published in this month’s edition of the journal Addictive Behaviors has concluded that cannabis use does not increase the odds of aggression betweencannabisstock intimate partners, whereas alcohol directly increases the possibility of such aggression

For the study, male college students in relationships committed daily surveys for a 90-day period, assessing their cannabis and alcohol use, as well as any act of aggression they committed towards their partner, whether it be physical aggression (any forceful act with the intent of causing injury), psychological aggression (insults, belittling, threats or intimidation) and sexual aggression (forced sexual contact or coercion).

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New Study Indicates Cannabis May Reduce Aggression, Improve Social Interactions

A new study published by the journal Neuropharmacology has found that cannabinoids may reduce aggression, and improve social interactions.Marijuana_Plants-3

For the study, researchers “examined the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1r) in aggressive behavior”, and found that a compound meant to mimic THC (a prime compound of cannabis) “significantly decreased the aggression levels” of the mice that it was administered to. The researchers also examined mice which were bred without CB1 receptors, and found them to be more inherently aggressive than normal mice.

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