Study: Psychedelic Drugs May Treat Anxiety, Addiction and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

A psilocybin, or "magic", mushroom.
A psilocybin, or “magic”, mushroom.

By Alan Mozes, HealthDay Reporter

In a carefully controlled setting, psychedelic drugs such as LSD or “magic mushrooms” may benefit patients with hard-to-treat anxiety, addiction or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), new research suggests.

The finding comes from a review of small-scale and preliminary studies conducted recently in the United States, Canada and Europe, all of which await follow-up.

These preliminary results show that “in the right context, these drugs can help people a lot, especially people who have disorders that we generally treat poorly, such as end-of-life distress, PTSD, and addiction issues involving tobacco or alcohol,” said study co-author Matthew Johnson. Johnson is an associate professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore.

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New Study: CBD May Treat Symptoms Responsible For Alcohol and Cocaine Addiction Relapse

A new study published in the September issue of the journal Alcoholimage and Alcoholism has found strong evidence that cannabidiol, or CBD, may offer highly effective treatment for symptoms known to trigger addiction relapse.

The study, conducted by researchers from the Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department of the Scripps Research Institute, and the University of Maryland School of Pharmacology, examines the effect of CBD on animal models of alcohol and cocaine addiction.

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New Study Examines How Cannabis Consumers Determine Potency, How Much Goes Into Joints

A new study published in the journal Addiction has examined the wayThe Guardian joint cannabis consumers determine the potency of cannabis, and how much they use when rolling joints.

Researchers from the Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit of the University College London, and the Department of Psychology from the College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, examined a group of 247 cannabis consumers in the United Kingdom – 152 were considered “recreational” users, consuming cannabis 1–24 days each month, and 95 were recorded as “daily” users, consuming cannabis 25 days or more out of the month.

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New Study: Cannabis May Treat Addiction

According to a new study published last week by the National Institute of Health, cannabis may be an effective treatment in curing people of addiction from hard drugs such as cocaine and amphetamines.cannabis

According to researchers, this study “presents an up-to-date review with deep insights into the pivotal role of the ECBS [endocannabinod system] in the neurobiology of stimulant addiction and the effects of its modulation on addictive behaviors. They state that; “A growing number of studies support a critical role of the ECBS and its modulation by synthetic or natural cannabinoids in various neurobiological and behavioral aspects of stimulants addiction.”

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