Study: Medical Cannabis Legalization Decreases Workplace Absences

workplace absences

(Photo: Matthew Staver).

According to a new study published in the journal Health Economics, the legalization of medical cannabis is associated with a decrease in the total number of workplace absences that are caused by sickness.

For the study, researchers analyzed workplace data in 24 states that have enacted laws allowing for the medical use of cannabis.

“Utilizing the Current Population Survey, the study identifies that absences due to sickness decline following the legalization of medical marijuana”, states the study’s abstract.

It continues; “The effect is stronger in states with ‘lax’ medical marijuana regulations, for full-time workers, and for middle-aged males, which is the group most likely to hold medical marijuana cards.”

Researchers found that following medical cannabis legalization, full-time employees between the ages of 50 and 59 were 13% less likely to report absences due to sickness; those ages 40 to 49 were 11% less likely, and those aged 30 to 39 were 16% less likely,

Researchers conclude that; “The results of this paper therefore suggest that medical marijuana legalization would decrease costs for employers as it has reduced self-reported absence from work due to illness/medical issues.”

The full study, conducted at the University of Wisconsin, can be found by clicking here.

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