Study: Marijuana Reduces Hypertension in Elder Subjects

Study: Marijuana Reduces Hypertension in Elder Subjects

According to a new study published in the journal European Journal of Internal Medicine, and epublished by the National Institute of Health, elder subjects with hypertension have a favorable response to treatment using medical marijuana.

 

“Medical cannabis use is increasing rapidly in the past several years, with older adults being the fastest growing group”, states the study’s abstract. “Nevertheless, the evidence for cardiovascular safety of cannabis use is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cannabis on blood pressure, heart rate, and metabolic parameters in older adults with hypertension.”

 

For the study, researchers (from Israel’s Ben-Gurion University) “conducted a prospective study of patients aged 60 years or more with hypertension and a new prescription of cannabis.” They “performed the following assessments: 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, ECG, blood tests, and anthropometric measurements prior to the initiation of cannabis therapy and 3 months afterward.” The primary outcome “was change in mean 24-h blood pressure at 3 months.”

 

In total 26 individuals took part in the study, with a mean age of 70. The study took part over a three-month period, with subjects consuming marijuana either orally via extracts of by smoking.

 

Researchers performed an ECG, a 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, anthropometric measurements and various blood tests prior to them starting the use of marijuana and after.

 

Researchers found that: “Cannabis treatment for three months was associated with a reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as heart rate.” They conclude by stating that “amongst older adults with hypertension, cannabis treatment for 3 months was associated with a reduction in 24-hours systolic and diastolic blood pressure values with a nadir at 3 hours after cannabis administration.

 

 

The study’s abstract:

 

Background: Medical cannabis use is increasing rapidly in the past several years, with older adults being the fastest growing group. Nevertheless, the evidence for cardiovascular safety of cannabis use is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cannabis on blood pressure, heart rate, and metabolic parameters in older adults with hypertension.

 

Methods: We conducted a prospective study of patients aged 60 years or more with hypertension and a new prescription of cannabis. We have performed the following assessments: 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, ECG, blood tests, and anthropometric measurements prior to the initiation of cannabis therapy and 3 months afterward. The primary outcome was change in mean 24-h blood pressure at 3 months.

 

Results: Twenty-six patients with a mean age of 70.42 ± 5.37 years, 53.8% females completed the study. At 3 months follow-up, the mean 24-hours systolic and diastolic blood pressures were reduced by 5.0 mmHg and 4.5 mmHg, respectively (p<0.001 for both). The nadir for the blood pressure and heart rate was achieved at 3 hours post-administration. The proportion of normal dippers changed from 27.3% before treatment to 45.5% afterward. No significant changes were seen in the different metabolic parameters assessed by blood tests, anthropometric measurements, or ECG exam.

 

Conclusion: amongst older adults with hypertension, cannabis treatment for 3 months was associated with a reduction in 24-hours systolic and diastolic blood pressure values with a nadir at 3 hours after cannabis administration.

 

Below are the study’s affiliated researchers:

  • Cannabis Clinical Research Institute and Clinical Research Center, Soroka University Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: ranabu@post.bgu.ac.il.
  • Department of Nephrology, Soroka University Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: yosefsha@clalit.org.il.
  • Division of Hematology, Assuta Ashdod Academic Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: meravlei@assuta.co.il.
  • Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Assuta Ashdod Academic Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel; Department of Medicine, Mount Auburn Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: adilei@assuta.co.il.
  • Division of Oncology, Assuta Ashdod Academic Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Electronic address: larisar@assuta.co.il.
  • Cannabis Clinical Research Institute and Clinical Research Center, Soroka University Medical Center, and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-G

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