Initiative to Legalize Recreational Cannabis Filed in Mississippi

The group Mississippi for Cannabis has filed an initiative with the Mississippimississippi Secretary of State in hopes of putting the legalization of cannabis to a vote of the people in the 2016 presidential election.

“Now we are waiting for official approval from the Mississippi Secretary of State, and the Attorney General which will include a ballot initiative number and the official format for the collection of signatures,” says Kelly Jacobs with Mississippi for Cannabis.

If the Secretary of State’s Office and Attorney General’s Office does approve the petition, the group will have a year to collect approximately 110,000 signatures from registered Mississippi voters in order to put the initiative to a vote in November, 2016.

According to Jacobs, the initiative would legalize the possession and private cultivation of cannabis for those 21 and older, without setting any limits on how much a person can possess or grow.

“We want to legalize marijuana and decriminalize it,” says Jacobs. “It’s an adult discussion we should be having.”

TheJointBlog

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    • Anonymous on December 15, 2015 at 7:37 pm
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    Think about all the states around mississippi that would come alot of money. Wake up phil bryant

    • Anonymous on January 18, 2015 at 10:39 pm
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    Lets get these signatures! I’m positive the Ms. Gulf Coast is in!!

    • tShip on January 14, 2015 at 8:53 am
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    I am completely for the legalization AND taxation of marijuana. Now, while I don’t believe in the economic format we are all subject to, we are all subject to it for now. That being said, Mississippi has long been the poorest state along with being a leader in obesity, diabetes, and other debilitating conditions.

    With the legalization of this medical cornucopia of cures and reliefs we would see a daunting reduction in cases of diabetes, obesity, chronic pain, chronic headaches and migraines, fibromyalgia, and even cancer. The positive medical effects of marijuana on the human body are in the thousands and time along with dedicated research and development can only yield more facts about the beneficial uses for this herb. It has been recorded in states such as Colorado and all throughout California and Washington that the medical use of marijuana has been beneficial for patients of all these illnesses.

    The taxation of marijuana would also yield a tremendous in the economy from the individual all the way to the international levels. The Union of marijuana sales is a multi-BILLION dollar untaxed business right now in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The individuals in any given community are going to purchase staples and commodities from local, interstate, and international providers. With the legalization and taxation of what once was a major cash crop in the United States we would see a decline in slums and ghettos and eventually a significant reduction in crime (but that is another discussion all together). If individuals are able to grow and sell a product locally it would then drop in price due to lack of transporting the product and a lack of risk due to its legalization. As the individual gains more capital from their sales, the community not only gains more capital by the taxes placed on that sale but also by the individual spending said capital in the community and the taxation of the products purchased and so on. It would all come full circle. This increase in capital from dispensaries, growers, sellers, etc would not only provide more tax dollars for law enforcement, education, and health but also potentially lower the taxes on the consumer.

    • William Lee on December 27, 2014 at 5:01 pm
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    well you come by my home and I’ll sign it, and my wife, and probably most of our friends if you are down this way send an email. I think I can drum up a few signatures

  1. i am glad the marijuana movement has finally gained so momentum.. I have been waiting on this for Fifty years, I just hope I’m alive when it’s changed. back during the seventies I worked at a FDA research center. They studied the pathophysiology of the effects oh marijuana on lab rats. They found that there was a lowering of blood pressures in rats that were genetically engineered to have hypertension. There was a marked reduction in aggression in rats engineered to be aggressive.. There were far more benefits from marijUna.during those studies we had federal agents bringing the marijUna to the Center , the marijuana was grown In Mississippi and trans ported every two weeks for the length of the study.The center was The National Center for Toxicological Research. Located in Jefferson Arkansas. They took the section of the PIne Bluff Ark. Arsenal that used to be the section that housed the Dept. Of biological warfare . . What gets me is that the government has known the positive effects of marijUna for more than Forty years. The study we were part of was a follow-up of previous studies some done back in the late 1950’s and the early 1960’s.. From what I was able to gather from some of the studies there was a marked increase in the benefits from pot along with the increase in the THC content of they pot the government was growing. Back then in the late 1960’s pot was mild at about 0.2% now days you can find pot from Vietnam that can be as high as 25%or higher. So synthetic forms to day as well as hash oil can be 40% to close to 100%. What is found on the street is 10-15% the bad thing about the pot today at 10% is that the LETHAL DOSE IS 1400 POUND INJESTED OVER 15 MINUTES. Or course if you use that much in 15 minutes you are asking for it. There is some info that can be found @ braincbennett.com. I’m looking foreword to it becoming legal. Alcohol still kills 60,000 people today and injures another 60,000. And as a retired E.R. nurse I can say for a fact I have never seen any one come in from a high speed accident on pot but I can’t even begin to say how many drunks came in drunk but I’ll say with some certainly that it was everyone of them

    • Rico on November 10, 2014 at 2:42 pm
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    You damn right I support it!!!

    • Seth on November 9, 2014 at 1:22 pm
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    I’m willing to help here in hancock county.

    • brooks on November 9, 2014 at 12:21 pm
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    I fully support the legalization and regulation of cannabis in mississippi. I feel a proper regulatory system can handle drugs better than drug cartels and street gangs. This is a wonderful step forward for mississippians and a wonderful step forward for actually humans rights. GREAT JOB FELLOW MISSISSIPPIANS. Lets do this together. Also thank a huge thank you to the joint blog for mentioning our efforts.

  2. I too, have had to be on med meds, They put me on too much! I was so sick of pills! So Far So Good!
    Thank God!

    • Jason on November 9, 2014 at 8:42 am
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    I fully support this initiative! Prescription medications have torn my body up, riddled my family with drug addiction. Why do we supply the FEDERAL govt with their medical marijuana but we can’t utilize the medicine

    • chuck on November 9, 2014 at 7:15 am
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    We all need to wake up in Mississippi and realize a State with 24 percent of its population living in poverty the legalization of Cannabis in Mississippi would be a huge economic benefit for all citizens in this State by creating jobs as well as reducing the Prison population in Mississippi by a considerable amount which is another huge burden on tax paying citizens of Mississippi. Wake up Mississippi.

    • Dave Rocconi on November 9, 2014 at 6:08 am
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    I will help get signatures in bolivar county.

  3. Volunteers who wish to help collect legible signatures, written in black ink, by registered voters, may write to me at Kellitaj@aol.com. Soon we will have our official multipage petition and will need everyone’s help to collect the 21, 433 signatures needed from 5 different MS districts to qualify the initiative for the 2016 ballot.

    • Lauren Ritter on October 1, 2014 at 6:17 pm
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    I would support this all the way a severe insomniac severe anxiety and panic disorders and severe back pain sufferer I refuse to take pharmaceutical drugs but this means so much for me!!!

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