CBD from Hemp Associated with Improved HDL Cholesterol Levels

According to a new study, hemp-derived CBD oil extract is associated with improved HDL cholesterol levels. The study was published in Journal of Dietary Supplements: It’s titled Effects of hemp extract on markers of wellness, stress resilience, recovery and clinical biomarkers of safety in overweight, but otherwise healthy subjects.

For the study researchers examined the health effects of CBD extract (15 mg per serving) from hemp and compared it against a placebo. Researchers “determined the effects of a commercially available, GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) by independent conclusion, CBD-containing hemp oil extract on stress resilience, perceived recovery, mood, affect, body composition, and clinical safety markers in healthy human subjects.”

The study found that CBD improved HDL cholesterol (known as the “good cholesterol”) levels compared with those taking a placebo. CBD was also found to improve sleep and increased overall improvement in quality of life.

“Overall, these findings suggest that supplementation with this hemp extract at the provided dosage in the men and women studied exhibited improvements in HDL cholesterol, tended to support psychometric measures of perceived sleep quantity and stress response, perceived life pleasure, and is well tolerated in healthy human subjects”, states the study.



Below is the study’s full abstract:

We determined the effects of a commercially available, GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) by independent conclusion, CBD-containing hemp oil extract on stress resilience, perceived recovery, mood, affect, body composition, and clinical safety markers in healthy human subjects.

Methods: Using a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind design, 65 overweight, but otherwise healthy men and women (35.2 ± 11.4 years, 28.5 ± 3.3 kg/m2) ingested either Hemp Oil Extract [Hemp, 60 mg/d PlusCBDTM Extra Strength Hemp Extract Oil (15 mg hemp-derived CBD)] or a placebo (PLA) every day for six weeks while continuing to follow their normal diet and physical activity patterns. Outcome variables included changes in stress resilience, a 14-item panel of various psychometric parameters, heart-rate variability, plasma chromogranin A, body composition, and general markers of health. Data were analyzed using mixed factorial ANOVA, t-tests with 95% confidence intervals, and effect sizes (ES).



Results: HDL cholesterol significantly improved in the Hemp group (p = 0.004; ES = 0.75). No other statistically significant group x time interaction effects were observed. Statistical tendencies for between-group differences were found for ‘I Get Pleasure From Life’ (p = 0.06, ES = 0.48) and ‘Ability to Cope with Stress’ (p = 0.07, ES = 0.46). Sleep quality (Hemp, p = 0.005, ES = 0.54) and sleep quantity (Hemp, p = 0.01, ES = 0.58) exhibited significant within-group changes. All values for hepato-renal function, cardiovascular health, fasting blood lipids, and whole blood cell counts remained within normal clinical limits with no between-group differences over time being identified.

Conclusions: Hemp supplementation improved HDL cholesterol, tended to support psychometric measures of perceived sleep, stress response, and perceived life pleasure and was well tolerated with no clinically relevant safety concerns. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov

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