Survey Finds Strong Majority of Physicians Believe Marijuana is a “Legitimate Medical Therapy”

According to a new study – titled A survey of the attitudes, beliefs and knowledge about medical cannabis among primary care providers – around six in ten primary care physicians believe that medical cannabis is a “legitimate” therapeutic option. The study was published in the journal BMC Family Practice.

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Study: THCV Reduces Cravings from Nicotine

According to a new study titled Δ8 -Tetrahydrocannabivarin has potent anti-nicotine effects in multiple rodent models of nicotine dependence, the administration of the cannabis compound THCV (tetrahydrocannabivarin) reduces nicotine cravings and use in rodents.


The study was published by the British Journal of Pharmacology, as well as the U.S. National Institute of Health

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Study: Marijuana Use Associated With Lower Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

According to a new study, those with a history of marijuana use are less likely to develop the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) than those who haven’t used cannabis.

The study, titled “Cannabis consumption and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A three years longitudinal study in first-episode non-affective psychosis patients”, was published in the journal Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry.

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Study: Marijuana Consumers Have Lower Mortality, Morbidity, and Hospitalization-Costs Among Pancreatitis Patients

Those with acute pancreatitis who have a history of marijuana use have “lower age-adjusted, mortality, morbidity, and hospitalization-cost than non-cannabis-exposed patients”, according to a new study.

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How Cannabis Can Help Seniors Improve Their Quality Of Life

 

Senior citizens can enjoy a heightened quality of life thanks to the immense, versatile therapeutics of cannabis. Whether you’re smoking, dabbing, vaping, or using CBD oil and infusions, there is always a way to get potent pain relief and a noticeable lift to your mood. If you’re open cured dried herbs, then there are endless strains of marijuana to choose from, each giving a profoundly different effect. Same goes for the various concentrations of cannabinoids in CBD-oils and extracts, as well as other products like edibles. Getting the medical benefits doesn’t mean that you need to get high, and if you do, there are tons of options for you. Let’s take a close look at how cannabis can help seniors improve their quality of life.

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Study: Strong Majority of Hospice Professionals Support Medical Marijuana

A large majority of hospice  professionals support medical marijuana, according to a new study published in The Journal of Palliative Medicine and published online by the U.S. National Institute of Health.

For the study – titled A survey of hospice professional regarding medical cannabis practices – researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of 310 hospice professionals (primarily nurses) from 40 states. 91% of respondents said that they endorse medical marijuana for hospice patients. In addition, 90% stated that they have fielded questions from patients regarding medical marijuana, and 73% said that they’ve had a patient who has used it.

The study states that “[R]egardless of legal status, hospice staff overwhelmingly support patient access to MC (medical cannabis). Those who practice in states where MC is not yet legal wish that it was.”

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Presence Of THC In Blood is Not Associated With Crash Culpability, Finds Study

According to a new study, drivers who test positive for THC do not possess a significantly increased risk of being responsible for a non-fatal motor vehicle accident.

For the study, researchers at the University of British Columbia compared the likelihood of crash responsibility in drivers testing positive for THC and/or other substances as compared to drug-free drivers over a six-year period (2010 to 2016).

As reported on by NORML, the state found that, “In this multi-site observational study of non-fatally injured drivers, we found no increase in crash risk, after adjustment for age, sex, and use of other impairing substances, in drivers with THC<5ng/ml. For drivers with THC>5ngml there may be an increased risk of crash responsibility, but this result was statistically non-significant and further study is required. … Our findings … suggest that the impact of cannabis on road safety is relatively small at present time.”

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