Study: Cannabis Terpenoids “Exert Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities in Vitro and in Vivo”

Terpenoids derived from cannabis “exert anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities in vitro and in vivo”, according to a new study published by the National Institute of Health.

“Cannabinoids are well known to have anti-inflammatory effects in mammalians; however, the Cannabis plant also contains other compounds such as terpenoids, whose biological effects have not yet been characterized”, states the abstract of the study, which was conducted by researchers at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.  With this in mind, the aim of this study “was to compare the anti-inflammatory properties of terpenoids with those of cannabidiol (CBD).”

For the study “Essential oils prepared from three monoecious nonpsychoactive chemotypes of Cannabis were analyzed for their terpenoid content and subsequently studied pharmacologically for their anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo.”

Read moreStudy: Cannabis Terpenoids “Exert Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities in Vitro and in Vivo”

The Top 10 Cannabis Studies of 2018

It’s that time again – here is our sixth annual Top Cannabis Studies of the Year list. 

Continuing the trend of the past several years, 2018 provided us with a massive amount of peer-reviewed research demonstrating the wide-ranging benefits of cannabis and the liberation of laws surrounding it. With that in mind, this year was as big a challenge as ever to narrow these studies down to the top 10, but after much thought and debate that’s what we’ve done!

Below is our list of the 10 most important cannabis studies of the year (in no particular order):

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Medical Cannabis Use Associated With Reduced Opioid Use In Pain Patients, Finds Study

The use of medical cannabis for at least a month is associated with reduced opioid use in pain patients, according to a new study.

The study, titled Opioid dose reduction and pain control with medical cannabis, was published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. It was conducted by researchers at the Kymera Independent Physicians medical group.

For the study, “A retrospective cohort was evaluated to understand the pattern of care and QOL [quality of life] outcomes with MC [medical cannabis] use across rural multidisciplinary practices in New Mexico. ” QOL questionnaire included a graded pain scale, and “morphine equivalent (ME) dose was used to estimate changes in opioid dose.” ODR was defined “as any reduction of baseline opioid dose.” A chi-square was performed to evaluate associations.

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Study: Marijuana Stores Associated With Increased Home Values

Medical and recreational marijuana dispensaries are associated with a significant increase in home value, according to a new study published by the journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

(Photo: DenverHomeLender.com).

For the study, titled The effect of marijuana dispensary openings on housing prices, researchers evaluated “the effect of medical and recreational dispensary openings on housing prices in Denver, Colorado.” Using an “event study approach”, they found that “the introduction of a new dispensary within a half‐mile radius of a new home increases home prices by approximately 7.7% on average.”

The study notes that this effect “diminishes for homes further from new dispensaries but is consistent over time.” Researchers conclude by stating that “Our results provide important and timely empirical evidence on the socioeconomic impacts of marijuana legalization.”

Read moreStudy: Marijuana Stores Associated With Increased Home Values

Study: CBD Reduces Airway Inflammation and Fibrosis in Experimental Allergic Asthma.

According to a new study published by the European Journal of Pharmacology, and epublished by the U.S. National Institute of Health, cannabidiol (CBD) reduces airway inflammation and fibrosis in experimental allergic asthma.

“Asthma remains a major public health problem and, at present, there are no effective interventions capable of reversing airway remodelling”, states the study’s abstract. “Cannabidiol (CBD) is known to exert immunomodulatory effects through the activation of cannabinoid-1 and -2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors located in the central nervous system and immune cells, respectively.” However, “as the role of CBD on airway remodelling and the mechanisms of CB1 and CB2 aren’t fully elucidated, this study was designed to evaluate the effects of cannabidiol in this scenario”

For the study. allergic asthma was induced in mice. “CBD treatment, regardless of dosage, decreased airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas static lung elastance only reduced with high dose.” These outcomes “were accompanied by decreases in collagen fibre content in both airway and alveolar septa and the expression of markers associated with inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung homogenate.”

Read moreStudy: CBD Reduces Airway Inflammation and Fibrosis in Experimental Allergic Asthma.

Study: Medical Marijuana Associated With Reduced Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia Patients

Fibromyalgia patients suffering from lower back pain respond favorably to medical cannabis as a treatment, according to a new study published in the journal Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, and epublished by the National Institute of Health.

For the study, researchers assessed the analgesic efficacy of both opioids and medical cannabis in 31 fibromyalgia (FM) patients with lower back pain. Participants were treated with inhaled cannabis containing less than 5% THC for a six month period

According to a press release from NORML, patients reported greater pain improvement with medical cannabis as opposed to the use of opioids alone. Patients demonstrated increased range of motion following cannabis treatment, but did not show any similar improvement with opioids. While undergoing cannabis treatment, the majority of patients elected to “decrease or discontinue pharmaceutical analgesic consumption”.

Read moreStudy: Medical Marijuana Associated With Reduced Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia Patients

Study: Marijuana Use Associated With Decreased Incidence of Liver Cirrhosis in Those With Hepatitis C

Marijuana use is associated with decreased incidence of liver cirrhosis in those with the Hepatitis C Virus, according to a new study published by the Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

A cirrhosis word cloud.

“The effect of cannabis use on chronic liver disease (CLD) from Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection, the most common cause of CLD, has been controversial”, states the study’s abstract. “Here, we investigated the impact of cannabis use on the prevalence of CLD among HCV infected individuals.”

For the study researchers “analyzed hospital discharge records of adults (age ≥ 18 years) with a positive HCV diagnosis”, evaluating “records from 2007 to 2014 of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS)” while excluding “records with other causes of chronic liver diseases (alcohol, hemochromatosis, NAFLD, PBC, HBV, etc.).”

Read moreStudy: Marijuana Use Associated With Decreased Incidence of Liver Cirrhosis in Those With Hepatitis C

Study Says “CBD Shows Similar Efficacy in the Severe Pediatric Epilepsies to Other Antiepileptic Drugs”

Cannabidiol (CBD) “shows similar efficacy in the severe paediatric epilepsies to other antiepileptic drugs”,  states a new meta-study published by the journal Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, and epublished by the National Institute of Health.”

“There are hundreds of compounds found in the marijuana plant, each contributing differently to the antiepileptic and psychiatric effects”, states the study’s abstract. “Despite considerable community interest in the use of CBD for paediatric epilepsy, there has been little evidence for its use apart from anecdotal reports, until the last year. ” Researchers note that “Three randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials in Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome found that CBD produced a 38% to 41% median reduction in all seizures compared to 13% to 19% on placebo.”

Similarly, “CBD resulted in a 39% to 46% responder rate (50% convulsive or drop-seizure reduction) compared to 14% to 27% on placebo. CBD was well tolerated; however, sedation, diarrhoea, and decreased appetite were frequent.”

Read moreStudy Says “CBD Shows Similar Efficacy in the Severe Pediatric Epilepsies to Other Antiepileptic Drugs”

Study: Cannabis Smoke Has No Impact on Lung Health

Cannabis smoke exposure is not detrimental to lung health and is not associated with the onset of lung cancer, emphysema, or COPD, according to a new study published in the journal Chest.

Donald Tashkin of UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine reviewed dozens of studies assessing cannabis smoke exposure and lung health, involving thousands of subjects.

He reports: “Although regular smoking of marijuana is associated with an increased risk of symptoms of chronic bronchitis and evidence of inflammation and injury involving the larger airways, lung function findings, although mixed, do not provide compelling evidence that habitual marijuana smoking in the manner and amount that it is generally smoked increases the risk of COPD, at least at the population level. Despite the presence of carcinogens in marijuana smoke in concentrations comparable with those that are found in tobacco smoke, the weight of evidence from well-designed epidemiologic studies does not support the concept that habitual marijuana use in the manner and quantity in which it is customarily smoked, when adjusted for tobacco, is a significant risk factor for the development of lung cancer.”

Studies also fail to show a relationship between cannabis smoking and decrements in lung function, and “argue against an association of marijuana with clinically significant emphysema.”

Tashkin’s findings are similar to those of past reviews finding that cannabis smoke exposure fails to possess the same sort of significant adverse pulmonary effects as does tobacco.

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Marijuana and lung disease,” appears in Chest. NORML’s fact-sheet, “Cannabis exposure and lung health,” appears online.

Study: Adolescent Marijuana Use in Canada Has Dropped Nearly 50% Since 2008

Marijuana use among adolescents in Canada has declined significantly in recent years, and fewer teens say that the substance is easy to obtain, according to a new study published in the journal Preventive Medicine.

For the study, researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario assessed teen marijuana use trends for the years 2004 to 2015. Researchers reported that adolescent use fell nearly 50% between the years 2008/2009 and 2014/2015. The percentage of teens who acknowledged that accessing cannabis “would be easy” fell nearly 40% between 2006/2007 and 2014/2015.

“Overall, cannabis use among Canadian youth appears to have peaked around 2008/09, with substantial declines over the past decade,” states researchers.

Read moreStudy: Adolescent Marijuana Use in Canada Has Dropped Nearly 50% Since 2008