Activation Of Cannabinoid Receptors Can Combat Aids, According to Government Funded Study

A 2012 study funded by the National Institute of Health found that in addition to relieving the symptoms of AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome), activation of the body’s cannabinoidMarijuana leaf receptors – something which cannabis does naturally – can actually combat its infection.

The study – which was conducted by researchers at George Mason University – found that; “the clinical use of CB2R agonists in the treatment of AIDS symptoms may also exert beneficial adjunctive antiviral effects against CXCR4-tropic viruses in late stages of HIV-1 infection.”

Researchers found that; “Agonism of CB2R.. reduced infection in primary CD4+ T cells following cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission of CXCR4-tropic virus.”

In addition, they “found that CB2R agonism decreased CXCR4-activation mediated G-protein activity and MAPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, CB2R agonism altered the cytoskeletal architecture of resting CD4+ T cells by decreasing F-actin levels.”

They go on to say that; “Our findings suggest that CB2R activation in CD4+ T cells can inhibit actin reorganization and impair productive infection following cell-free or cell-associated viral acquisition of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 in resting cells.

This study is one of the most comprehensive of its kind to show that activation of the cannabinoid receptor (A.K.A. cannabis consumption) can have antiviral capabilities when it came to combating AIDS.

The study can be in its entirety by clicking here.

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