Study: Adolescent Marijuana Use in Canada Has Dropped Nearly 50% Since 2008

Marijuana use among adolescents in Canada has declined significantly in recent years, and fewer teens say that the substance is easy to obtain, according to a new study published in the journal Preventive Medicine.

For the study, researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario assessed teen marijuana use trends for the years 2004 to 2015. Researchers reported that adolescent use fell nearly 50% between the years 2008/2009 and 2014/2015. The percentage of teens who acknowledged that accessing cannabis “would be easy” fell nearly 40% between 2006/2007 and 2014/2015.

“Overall, cannabis use among Canadian youth appears to have peaked around 2008/09, with substantial declines over the past decade,” states researchers.

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Study Finds Consumers of CBD-Rich Cannabis Extracts “Generally Tested Negative for THC in Hair”

According to a new study being published in the journal Forensic Science International, and epublished ahead of print by the National Institute of Health, even after repeated consumption of CBD-rich cannabis extracts consumers “generally tested negative for THC in hair”.

Consume CBD extracts? You probably won’t fail a hair test, according to a new study,

“Medical cannabis is becoming increasingly popular for many different ailments and improvement of general well-being”, begins the study’s abstract. “Particularly CBD-rich extracts are easily available via online pharmacies, health stores or directly from producers. However, almost all of the extracts contain small amounts of THC. In our study, we investigated THC, CBN and CBD in hair samples from regular CBD rich cannabis users. ”

The goals of the study “were to determine levels of the cannabinoids in hair and to evaluate a possible correlation between regular CBD intake and CBD levels in hair.” All participants consumed cannabis extracts from the same producer, which “contained CBD at different concentrations and small amounts of THC with a CBD/THC concentration ratio of 30”.

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Study: CBD Reduces Cocaine Intake

According to a new study published by the journal Neuropharmacology, cannabidiol (CBD) reduces cocaine intake and has “pro-neurogenic effects” in cocaine consuming animals.

(Photo: Dmitry Tishchenko – Getty Images).

The study, titled Repeated Cannabidiol treatment reduces cocaine intake and modulates neural proliferation and CB1R expression in the mouse hippocampus, was epublished by the National Institute of Health.

“Cannabinoid derivatives have shown promising results for treating neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction”, begins the study’s abstract. “To determine whether CBD can attenuate cocaine reinforcement, we assessed behavioural responses induced by cocaine in mice, using the behavioural sensitization, conditioned place preference and intravenous self-administration paradigms.”

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Study: CBD-Rich Cannabis Extracts Present “a Better Therapeutic Profile” Than Pure CBD

CBD-rich extracts which contain at least a small amounts of other cannabinoids “present a better therapeutic profile” than CBD alone, according to a new study published by the journal Frontiers in Neurology.

Cannabis oil (photo: David Downs).

The study, titled Potential Clinical Benefits of CBD-Rich Cannabis Extracts Over Purified CBD in Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy, states that the improved benefits of high-CBD cannabis extracts over pure CBD “is likely due to synergistic effects of CBD with other phytocompounds (aka Entourage effect)”.

According to the study’s abstract. “This meta-analysis paper describes the analysis of observational clinical studies on the treatment of refractory epilepsy with cannabidiol (CBD)-based products. Beyond attempting to establish the safety and efficacy of such products, we also investigated if there is enough evidence to assume any difference in efficacy between CBD-rich extracts compared to purified CBD products.”

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CBD May Help Treat Methamphetamine Dependency, States New Study

Cannabidiol (CBD) can “reduce the motivation to seek and consume methamphetamine”, suggesting it may be effective as a treatment for those addicted to the drug, finds a new study published by the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

“Methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that can cause many adverse physical, psychological and psychosocial effects”, begins the study’s abstract. “Preliminary evidence shows cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating constituent of the cannabis plant, may have efficacy in treating opioid and nicotine dependence. However, no study has yet examined whether cannabidiol treatment might impact on methamphetamine addiction.”

The current study “investigated whether cannabidiol administration reduces the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and relapse to methamphetamine-seeking behavior following abstinence.”

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Study: Cannabis Oil Reduces Seizures, Improves Quality of Life, in Those with Dravet Syndrome

According to a new study, cannabis oil (containing both CBD and THC) is effective in reducing seizure counts and improving quality of life measures in those with Dravet Syndrome.

An epilepsy word cloud.

The study, titled A prospective open-label trial of a CBD/THC cannabis oil in dravet syndrome, was published by the journal Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology.  According to the Dravet Foundation, dravet syndrome, also known as Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI), “is a rare and catastrophic form of intractable epilepsy that begins in infancy”, with “an estimated incidence rate of 1:16,000 to 1:21,000”.

The study’s abstract starts by stating that “Both Δ9 Tetrahydrocannabidiol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) components of cannabis, have been shown to have anticonvulsant effects. Cannabis oils are used to treat seizures in drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE).” It then goes on to note that “Recent trials provide data on dosing, side effects, and efficacy of CBD, yet there is a paucity of information on THC in epilepsy.”

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Study: Cannabinoids May Inhibit Tumor Growth in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

According to a new study published by the journal Photodiagnosis and Photodynamic Therapy, cannabinoids may inhibit tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer.

The study states that “Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the deadliest form of breast cancer because compared with other types of breast cancer, it is more aggressive, diagnosed at later stage and more likely to develop recurrence”. Many patients “do not experience adequate tumor control after current clinical treatments involving surgical removal, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, leading to disease progression and significantly decreased quality of life.”

Here researchers “report a new combinatory therapy strategy involving cannabinoid-based medicine and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of TNBC.” They found that “the combined CB2R agonist and TSPO-PDT treatment resulted in synergistic inhibition in TNBC cell and tumor growth.”

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Study: CBD Could Prevent Haloperidol-Induced Orofacial Dyskinesia

Cannabidiol (CBD) may prevent haloperidol-induced orofacial dyskinesia, according  to new research being published by the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity; the research was epublished by the National Institute of Health.

“The chronic use of drugs that reduce the dopaminergic neurotransmission can cause a hyperkinetic movement disorder called tardive dyskinesia (TD)”, states the study’s abstract. “The pathophysiology of this disorder is not entirely understood but could involve oxidative and neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Cannabidiol (CBD), the major non-psychotomimetic compound present in Cannabis sativa plant, could be a possible therapeutic alternative for TD.”

The study states that “This phytocannabinoid shows antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antipsychotic properties and decreases the acute motor effects of classical antipsychotics. The present study investigated if CBD would attenuate orofacial dyskinesia, oxidative stress and inflammatory changes induced by chronic administration of haloperidol in mice.”

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New Study Provides Evidence Supporting the Use of Cannabinoids to Treat Prostate Cancer

Cannabinoids may provide a potential treatment option for prostate cancer, according to a new study published by the journal The Prostate.

“Cannabinoids have demonstrated anticarcinogenic properties in a variety of malignancies, including in prostate cancer”, states researchers. In the present study, they “explored the anti-cancer effects of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) in prostate cancer.”

For the study, “Established prostate cancer cells (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were treated with varying concentrations of WIN”, and “Cell proliferation was determined by the MTS assay.” The anti-migration and anti-invasive potential of WIN “was examined by the wound healing assay and the matrigel invasion assay.” Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry, and mechanistic studies were performed by Western blot.

Read moreNew Study Provides Evidence Supporting the Use of Cannabinoids to Treat Prostate Cancer

Study: CBDA and THC Have Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Hyperalgesia Effects

Both cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) show  anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesia effects on acute inflammation, according to a new study published by the journal Psychopharmacology, and epublished ahead of print by the National Institute of Health.

“The present study evaluates the anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesia effects of CBD’s potent acidic precursor, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), in a rodent model of carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in the rat hind paw, when administered systemically (intraperitoneal, i.p.) or orally before and/or after carrageenan”, begins the study’s abstract. “In addition, we assess the effects of oral administration of THC or CBDA, their mechanism of action, and the efficacy of combined ineffective doses of THC and CBDA in this model. Finally, we compare the efficacy of CBD and CBDA.”

Researchers found that “CBDA given i.p. 60 min prior to carrageenan (but not 60 min after carrageenan) produced dose-dependent anti-hyperalgesia and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, THC or CBDA given by oral gavage 60 min prior to carrageenan produced anti-hyperalgesia effects, and THC reduced inflammation.”

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